South Africa already a national disaster before COVID-19

So definitely the stats on victims affected by the government far outweigh the COVID-19. You have placed many of our people in dire straits and without consideration for their welfare, do you believe that the majority could actually afford the testing of COVID 19?

Yesterday the President declared the country as a national disaster. Mr Ramaphosa eloquently articulated the consequences of the COVID-19 virus. Despite the logical and common-sense approach we see a failure to understand the plight of our people in townships.

It is recommended that interaction is at 6ft apart, handshakes to be replaced by an elbow touch. Most essentially that the washing of hands for 20 seconds on a regular basis is encouraged to stopping the spread of the virus.

Alas, Mr President through issues of poverty, some live in homes surrounded by neighbours in less than 2ft. The Ugu Region on the South Coast have watched their town destroyed by alleged negligence of the local municipality, many are left without clean water.

The state of the Nation was already a disaster. Now with COVID-19 the issues are acutely life-threatening, and we don’t believe you actually are able to truthfully know the numbers infected for to undergo a test would cost approximately R1200 per person and if you hadn’t noticed it is an average of two-weeks’ income despite your delusional minimum wage.

So definitely the stats on victims affected by the government far outweigh the COVID-19. You have placed many of our people in dire straits and without consideration for their welfare.

Service Delivery Protest -locals set town ablaze.

As the country pauses to remember the landmark election in 1994 yet another reminder remains that many lives are yet to change.

Schools, foreign-owned tuck shops, a clinic and a shopping mall have been forced to close in Orange Farm, south of Johannesburg,  due to a service delivery protest. Residents of the township blocked the Golden Highway with burning tyres and rocks on Monday morning, demanding that their ward councillor step down.

Protesters accuse ward 4 councillor Simon Motha of failing to deliver houses, tarred roads and water.

In addition to those grievances, Gogo Hilda Ngubane had pinned much hope on the vote that brought her freedom.

Her material conditions have not improved much in over two decades.

“Let them celebrate there on TV those who attained freedom let them celebrate. We who have not benefited from freedom will sit here,” says Ngubane.

Neither Gogo Hilda nor the Orange Farm community are willing to abandon the fight.

On the eve of freedom day residents say there is little to celebrate.

They have vowed to continue their protest action as the country marks 22 years of democracy.

 

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source:(picture)https://www.enca.com/south-africa/protesters-shutdown-orangefarm(2)http://www.sabc.co.za/news/a/62cf8b004c8bdde9918d972e33d6c236/-?

7 Steps in Securing a Government Tender

The definition of public procurement encompasses all purchases of goods and services by public institutions in a country, and involves contracts between the government and the private sector in a variety of areas such as health services, the military, construction, etc. Reliable procurement practices transform funds into hospitals, schools and roads.

Procurement accounts for a large part of public resources and thus it is important that the tender procedures occur in an accountable, transparent and well-managed way.

Corruption in public procurement takes away benefits meant for citizens, and lowers the levels of public trust and confidence in the government. It can also be linked to service delivery protests and the erosion of honest competitive bidding.

South Africa loses about R25- to R30-billion of the annual government procurement budget to tender corruption.

The definition of public procurement encompasses all purchases of goods and services by public institutions in a country, and involves contracts between the government and the private sector in a variety of areas such as health services, the military, construction, etc. Reliable procurement practices transform funds into hospitals, schools and roads.
Corruption in public procurement takes away benefits meant for citizens, and lowers the levels of public trust and confidence in the government.

Trends in reports

According to Corruption Watch data, the trends that emerge from submitted reports indicate that:

  • Bribery is rampant in tender processes;
  • Relevant committees indicate a preference for a certain supplier;
  • Tenders are not being advertised or circulated;
  • Dates are altered to accommodate certain suppliers;
  • Appointment of suppliers whose scores do not reflect that they are the best applicants.

The Public Protector has become an increasingly important public watchdog organisation in South Africa, particularly following the judgment by the Constitutional Court on 31 March 2016 on the powers of the Public Protector.

Baqwa has been praised for his contribution to establishing the Office of the Public Protector and raising awareness of the institution, its mandate and services.

Gary Pienaar, a chief investigator in the OPP national office from 1997 to 2002 and in the Western Cape provincial office from 2000 to 2008, notes that Baqwa significantly expanded the investigative skills capacity of staff and initiated an outreach programme that sent investigators into various communities to raise awareness about the OPP and its functions.

He has also been credited for his contribution to Chapter M of the Public Service Regulations, which serves as an administrative guide to ethical and efficient conduct in the public service, as well as with establishing positive relationships with other Chapter 9 institutions and the International Ombudsman Institute.

The then minister of health, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, was accused of misusing public funds and misleading Parliament, and the Public Protector was called on to investigate.

 

 

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source:http://www.corruptionwatch.org.za/understanding-tender-corruption-part-one/accessed15/04/16(2)Think Tenders. Freelance Bid Writing Service and Tender Writer Birmingham(3)http://www.corruptionwatch.org.za/sas-public-protectors-legacies-part-one/accessed15/04/16

Do Black People Enjoy Suffering?

Why do Black people show loyalty and dedication to their own yet their own show no care and will abandoned them, left for dead without delivery of services whilst the other races can receive by paying for it…but if you don’t have money what and how can you receive such benefits? But should essential services be considered benefits or is it not a Rights? Then why are not the Black communities protesting? Or should I be asking the question… do Black people enjoy suffering?

At University I was taught a very important lesson from a very wise professor saying that if I ask the right questions, I would be able to get the right responses which will contribute to a fuller understanding. So there are some questions which are bugging me and to which I’m having difficulties understanding. However I’m also having difficulties formulating my questions so here are my thoughts and along the way I will try to ask the right questions?

From my various travels to many countries I have had the opportunity to observe their lifestyles and culture, I have also come to realise “Black people” suffer prejudice almost everywhere. Whether it is in Europe, Asia or the Americas – black people have it difficult. I don’t particularly like using the term, “Black people” but my vocabulary in describing this particular group of people as “African” would be incorrect as I’m an African and I’m not Black but nonetheless you get the idea.

So to move on, I find that this particular race has had a difficult history and is currently also having a somewhat prejudiced and disadvantaged life. In South Africa, Black people have waited patiently for years to be able to be free from the oppression of “White Supremacy” and to many believed to have been their biggest constraining factor to liberation and prosperity.

However twenty years on and we have had three Black Presidents and yet there are still injustices which deprive Black people from achieving their full potential. As I drove-by Braamfortein yesterday in order to verify a news article noting that a rat was tested positive for having a plague due to the bin-collector strike. I saw the piles of refuse lined the streets whilst the green and stagnant liquid pools filled the pavement and to which school children having to walk on the roads.

I have not seen a problem escalate to this level in other neighbourhoods. Orange Grove did have a similar issue however after much complaining from a literate community their streets were cleaned. So why do the poor black communities have to endure such conditions? IMG_0189

Is this due to money or colour of skin? Yet in a democracy I believe that we all should be equal in the eyes of the Law and therefore why doesn’t the Black people protest against the poor delivery of services within their neighbourhoods? Why do they still vote for a Government which continues to abandon them and leave them without proper water, sanitation, education and medical services? There are many Non-profit organisations fulfilling the Governments obligations and creating opportunities for Black people, should this not be the governments responsibility?

Would education make a difference? Yet we have recently witnessed the President of South Africa violating the Constitution to which serves to protect its people. Education is not lacking  within the Government Cabinet and yet the majority will vote for the same oppressor to govern and the Cabinet will continue to support abuses to the Black people. Why do Black people show loyalty and dedication to their own yet their own show no care and will abandoned them, left for dead without delivery of services whilst the other races can receive by paying for it…but if you don’t have money what and how can you receive such benefits? But should essential services be considered benefits or is it not a Right?  Then why are not the Black communities protesting?

Or should I be asking the question… do Black people enjoy suffering?