When evil is called good and good evil.

Let’s pray for our country.

Partisan politics are destroying our country. Each person justifying their integrity through Word and not deed. We are now flying dangerously close to oblivion without a thought for its future or it’s children…

Definitely there must be a reason or a pressure which places the interests of self before their neighbour. A reason so real that does not allow the leaders to steal bread from their subjects.

We need to pray for the ANC, DA and EEF. Let’s pray that God brings conviction to our leaders. Let’s pray that those in position of leadership and authority will surrender to the fear of God.

President of South Africa – Cyril Ramaphosa?

He is one of South Africa’s richest men, with Forbes estimating his wealth at $675 million.

Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa (born 17 November 1952) is a South African politician, businessman, activist, and trade union leader who has served as the Deputy President under President Jacob Zuma since 2014. He was elected as Deputy President of the African National Congress (ANC) at the ANC National Conference in Mangaung in December 2012. He is also the Chairman of the National Planning Commission, which is responsible for strategic planning for the country

Respected as a skillful negotiator and strategist, Ramaphosa built up the biggest and most powerful trade union in South Africa—the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM)—and played a crucial role, with Roelf Meyer of the National Party, during the negotiations to bring about a peaceful end to apartheid and steer the country towards its first democratic elections in April 1994.Cyril_Ramaphose_greeting_President_of_Chile

He has been criticised, however, for his business interests, which include a seat on the board of Lonmin. On 15 August 2012 he called for action against the Marikana miners’ strike, which he called “dastardly criminal” conduct.

Among other positions, he is executive chairman of Shanduka Group, a company he founded. Shanduka Group has investments in the Resources Sector, Energy Sector, Real Estate, Banking, Insurance, and Telecoms (SEACOM). He is also chairman of The Bidvest Group Limited, and MTN. His other non-executive directorships include Macsteel Holdings, Alexander Forbes and Standard Bank. In March 2007 he was appointed Non-Executive joint Chairman of Mondi, a leading international paper and packaging group, when the company emerged from Anglo American plc. In July 2013 he retired from the board of SABMiller plc.

He is one of South Africa’s richest men, with Forbes estimating his wealth at $675 million.

 

 

 

 

 

 


source: Ferreira, Emsie (25 May 2014). "Few surprises in Zuma's new Cabinet". News24. SAPA. Retrieved 25 May 2014.
David Smith (24 October 2012). "Lonmin emails paint ANC elder as a born-again robber baron". the Guardian. London.
 [The Guardian|http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/dec/20/cyril-ramaphosa-return-nelson-mandela]
http://www.thetimes.co.za/News/Article.aspx?id=666599
News24, South Africa's premier news source, provides breaking news on national, world, Africa, sport, entertainment, technology & more.". News24.
Reuters.com". reuters.com.
Return of a prodigal son". The Economist. 22 December 2012.
South Africa: Fool's gold - The Economist". The Economist. 27 April 2013.

 

Dear His Excellency the President of South Africa

Sir, when people say that you are single-handedly destroying this country – I say nonsense, if you get to see what millions see every day of the incompetent staff at the utility companies, lazy councillors and those who think too highly of themselves trying to re-enact the accusations you were charged now rubbishing your legacy of invincibility.

Dear His Excellency the President of South Africa,

Humble citizen I am have decided to publicly apologise for doubting your intellect and qualifications. You do not realise it, but you are teaching us all of your supernatural powers to overcome all obstacles. Despite what others are throwing on your path – you show resilience and tenacity of a Zulu Warrior. I’m sure that Shaka must be looking down at you and learning a few manoeuvres himself hoping to apply it possibly in his next life.

Sir, when people say that you are single-handedly destroying this country – I say nonsense, if you get to see what millions see every day of the incompetent staff at the utility companies, lazy councillors and those who think too highly of themselves trying to re-enact the accusations you were charged now rubbishing your legacy of invincibility.

These groups of people who run the municipalities are the reason this country is failing! They work half day and move at a pace of slow, dead and died! So no, we cannot blame you, this would be unfair for those that run the country think they are you!

There can only be one Mr One!

I go around Africa and people ask me very embarrassing questions

“I go around Africa and people ask me very embarrassing questions about this Parliament.

“I am happy that you were able to handle the House but commenting as somebody who from time to time comes to this House to participate I believe the house needs to do more to bring this house to order,” he said in his reply to the budget vote debate on the presidency.

“I go around Africa and people ask me very embarrassing questions about this Parliament.

“I thought you should know this, some are complaining particularly in this region that in the manner in which we behave in Parliament, we are changing the perceptions they have heard about us, that we are a leading example of the constitutional democracy. They are now saying you are influencing some of their people in a wrong way.”

“ANC is the only political party that has the best interests of workers”

“We must not allow opportunists to take us back to the period of anarchy and destruction. We must also isolate and shun parties that promote disunity and divisions within our country,”noted Zuma.

The ANC is the only political party that has the best interests of workers at heart, Zuma said at a rally marking the International Workers Day in Mamelodi, Pretoria.

President Zuma warned against anarchy in South Africa, saying some political opportunists were trying to promote anarchy and thuggery in the country.

“Some desperate elements seem hell-bent to promote anarchy and chaos,”Zuma said. South Africa has worked hard to achieve peace after apartheid, the president said.

The ANC has been the ruling party of post-apartheid South Africa on the national level since 1994. Zuma lauded the ANC as the only political organization in the country that can produce policies and a legal environment that addresses the plight of the workers.

He urged South Africans to isolate political parties that advocate the use of violence in a free and democratic South Africa.

The elections come as the ANC-led government is haunted by a series of challenges, notably the Nkandla scandal, in which Zuma was accused of abusing public funding to revamp his private home, and the state capture by the Indian Gupta family which allegedly has influenced Zuma’s appointment of cabinet ministers.

 

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source:http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016-05/02/c_135327500.htm?accessed1/05/16

Do Black People Enjoy Suffering?

Why do Black people show loyalty and dedication to their own yet their own show no care and will abandoned them, left for dead without delivery of services whilst the other races can receive by paying for it…but if you don’t have money what and how can you receive such benefits? But should essential services be considered benefits or is it not a Rights? Then why are not the Black communities protesting? Or should I be asking the question… do Black people enjoy suffering?

At University I was taught a very important lesson from a very wise professor saying that if I ask the right questions, I would be able to get the right responses which will contribute to a fuller understanding. So there are some questions which are bugging me and to which I’m having difficulties understanding. However I’m also having difficulties formulating my questions so here are my thoughts and along the way I will try to ask the right questions?

From my various travels to many countries I have had the opportunity to observe their lifestyles and culture, I have also come to realise “Black people” suffer prejudice almost everywhere. Whether it is in Europe, Asia or the Americas – black people have it difficult. I don’t particularly like using the term, “Black people” but my vocabulary in describing this particular group of people as “African” would be incorrect as I’m an African and I’m not Black but nonetheless you get the idea.

So to move on, I find that this particular race has had a difficult history and is currently also having a somewhat prejudiced and disadvantaged life. In South Africa, Black people have waited patiently for years to be able to be free from the oppression of “White Supremacy” and to many believed to have been their biggest constraining factor to liberation and prosperity.

However twenty years on and we have had three Black Presidents and yet there are still injustices which deprive Black people from achieving their full potential. As I drove-by Braamfortein yesterday in order to verify a news article noting that a rat was tested positive for having a plague due to the bin-collector strike. I saw the piles of refuse lined the streets whilst the green and stagnant liquid pools filled the pavement and to which school children having to walk on the roads.

I have not seen a problem escalate to this level in other neighbourhoods. Orange Grove did have a similar issue however after much complaining from a literate community their streets were cleaned. So why do the poor black communities have to endure such conditions? IMG_0189

Is this due to money or colour of skin? Yet in a democracy I believe that we all should be equal in the eyes of the Law and therefore why doesn’t the Black people protest against the poor delivery of services within their neighbourhoods? Why do they still vote for a Government which continues to abandon them and leave them without proper water, sanitation, education and medical services? There are many Non-profit organisations fulfilling the Governments obligations and creating opportunities for Black people, should this not be the governments responsibility?

Would education make a difference? Yet we have recently witnessed the President of South Africa violating the Constitution to which serves to protect its people. Education is not lacking  within the Government Cabinet and yet the majority will vote for the same oppressor to govern and the Cabinet will continue to support abuses to the Black people. Why do Black people show loyalty and dedication to their own yet their own show no care and will abandoned them, left for dead without delivery of services whilst the other races can receive by paying for it…but if you don’t have money what and how can you receive such benefits? But should essential services be considered benefits or is it not a Right?  Then why are not the Black communities protesting?

Or should I be asking the question… do Black people enjoy suffering?

Possible reasons for ANC not firing Zuma?

Never before in his seven-year reign has there been such a strong call by a wide spectrum of ANC members for President Jacob Zuma to step down. Still, he emerged seemingly strongly after the weekend meeting of the party’s top leaders. So why couldn’t the national executive committee (NEC) fire Zuma?

The first question the party would have had to ask is whether they wanted to recall Zuma from the country’s presidency, or from the party’s presidency, orbit? Some believed it would not create a right precedent for national executive committee (NEC) alone to recall Zuma from the ANCs presidency, as this would be seen to be overriding the choice the branches made at the party’s elective conferences in 2007 and 2012.

Local government elections campaign: A source who attended the meeting and who was in the lobby group that wanted to see Zuma go, told M&G Online thatches group was in the majority but consciously pulled back because it would impact negatively on the party before the local government elections.

Bad precedents: Many in the ANC still remember President Thabo Mbeki’s recalling 2008 as a bruising, painful and polarising period in the governing party. Should Zuma be recalled as ANC president too, there is always the risk that Ramaphosa would not be elected ANC president, which would again present the problem of a duplication of power centres.

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sources:http://mg.co.za/article/2016-03-23-six-reasons-the-anc-didnt-fire-zuma?accessed23/03/2016

Here are six ways Mandela changed his country:

The difference between a selfless leader – in comparison to a selfish leader?

Forsaking bloodshed

The renunciation of violence was one of the defining moments of the political process, and earned Mandela and de Klerk the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize.

Forging a political path

The transition formally turned South Africa into a democracy, bringing in one of the world’s most progressive constitutions and allowing blacks not only into polling booths, but also into the corridors of power.

In doing so, South Africa also lost its global pariah status. Apartheid had been punished by sanctions including a trade embargo and a ban on direct flights to dozens of countries, like the United States.

A global player

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become “a rainbow nation” that would never again be seen as “the skunk of the world.”

He said: “We enter into a covenant that we shall build a society in which all South Africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts, assured of their inalienable right to human dignity – a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.”

Peace and forgiveness

Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions. Key to this was his 1995 establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission that investigated historic human rights violations and gave vent to grievances.

A cultural power

That same year, South Africa hosted the Rugby World Cup – the first event of its kind to be held there since the end of the apartheid-era sporting boycott. Along with cricket, rugby was a game played and enjoyed almost exclusively by whites, making the event tough for Mandela’s fledgling democratic government to “sell” to a wider population.

Despite resistance on both sides, Mandela swung the rainbow nation behind both the team – the Springboks – and the tournament, which South Africa won. That achievement, documented in the 2009 film “Invictus” starring Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon, illustrated the extent of South Africa’s rehabilitation and also set the country back on the path of sporting success.

A generous soul

Mandela’s other key legacy is his extensive charitable work, including the creation of the Nelson Mandela Foundation, the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and 46664 – the HIV-AIDS initiative named after his prison number. In 2009, the United Nations declared that July 18, Mandela’s birthday, would be a worldwide day of community service known as Nelson Mandela International Day.

 

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Source:http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/7-ways-nelson-mandela-changed-south-africa-f2D11702722accessed 10/03/15

South Africa is in the grips of its most serious economic and political crisis.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

The African National Congress, the liberation party –  ruling South Africa since 1994 – when the country elected its first post-apartheid government under the great Nelson Mandela. Almost two decades have passed since the end of legalised racial segregation in South Africa, yet the abolition of apartheid remains the biggest legacy of Nelson Mandela. The 1993 assassination of ANC figurehead Chris Hani by right-wing white extremists heightened fears that the country was destined for a racial blood bath, but Mandela issued an appeal:

Now is the time for all South Africans to stand together against those who, from any quarter, wish to destroy what Chris Hani gave his life for the freedom of all of us.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

Yet President Jacob Zuma’s government have taken an authoritarian and corrupt turn- at the very moment the country needs bold and honest leadership. Weak governance is preventing it from making critical policy choices and public investments to improve social welfare and realise Mandela’s dream of a multiracial “Rainbow nation.” It is also undercutting South Africa’s capacity to lead both in Africa and on the global stage.

 

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source:http://allafrica.com/view/group/main/main/id/00040383.htmlaccessed10/03/16-2.http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/7-ways-nelson-mandela-changed-south-africa-f2D11702722/accessed 10/03/16

Could Mrs Zuma be the next President of South Africa?

Ms Dlamini-Zuma’s fans often say that “South Africa is ready for a woman president.” Would she be any good? Her record in government is not exactly impressive. Susan Booysen, author of the book “Dominance and Decline: The ANC in theTime of Zuma”, predicts that she would be much like her ex-husband.

zumaThere is talk that His Excellency the President of South Africa, Jacob Zuma seems to be wondering how to share custody of the country with his ex-wifeMr Zuma must retire as South Africa’s president in 2019A quiet race is under way to pick the next president of the ruling partythe African National Congress.

Mr Zuma faced 783 charges of corruptionfraudmoney-laundering and tax evasion before he became presidentMr Zuma’s critics speculate that he wants his ex-wife at the helm as an ally to argue that the charges-which he claims are politically motivated-should never see the light of dayThe odds of another Zuma running South Africa are hard to gauge.

At the COSATU national congress in late November several unions openly backed Mr Ramaphosasaying that the deputy president of the ANC should succeed as party presidentas in the pastMr Ramaphosa stands to benefit from the mess Mr Zuma has made of the country’s credit rating.

In December the president replaced a respected finance minister with an unknown backbencherspooking the marketsMs Dlamini-Zuma’s fans often say that “South Africa is ready for a woman president.” Would she be any goodHer record in government is not exactly impressive. Susan Booysenauthor of the book “Dominance and DeclineThe ANC in theTime of Zuma“, predicts that she would be much like her ex-husband.

I think Zuma is going to be with us long after he has actually left office,” says Ms BooysenMr Zuma may not be able to name his own successor, howeverMr Zuma often giggles throughout his questions in Parliament for the yeardespite the serious issues before hima severe droughtan economy close to recession and reports that taxpayers are to fork out for a brand-new4 billion-rand presidential jet

 

 

 

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source: 1.picture-http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/WO-AK427_AFUNIO_P_20120715175528.jpg/ 2.content:http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21685324-giving-presidency-his-ex-wife-might-be-jacob-zumas-best-shot-avoiding?zid=304&ah=e5690753dc78ce91909083042ad12e30