The Need for Redistribution of Land Reform in South Africa -P1

Today, South Africa has one of most unequal distributions of income in the world, and income and quality of life are strongly correlated with race, location and gender. The political compromise that ensued left much of the power and wealth of the white minority, including land ownership, more or less intact.

The extent of land dispossession of the indigenous population in South Africa, by Dutch and British settlers, was greater than any other country in Africa and persisted for an exceptionally long time.

By the twentieth century, most of the county, including most of the best agricultural land, was reserved for the minority white settler population, with the African majority confined to just 13% of the territory, the ‘native reserves’, later known as African Homelands or Bantustans.

Over thirteen million black people, the majority of them poverty-stricken remained crowded into the former homelands, where rights to land were generally unclear or contested and the system of land administration was in disarray.

Today, South Africa has one of most unequal distributions of income in the world, and income and quality of life are strongly correlated with race, location and gender. The political compromise that ensued left much of the power and wealth of the white minority, including land ownership, more or less intact.

The Constitutional clause on property guaranteed the rights of existing owners but also granted specific rights of redress to victims of past dispossession.

South African agriculture is highly dualistic in nature, where a highly-developed and generally large-scale commercial sector, controlled largely by whites, on privately-owned land, co-exists with large numbers of small-scale and mainly subsistence-oriented black farms on communally-held land.

South Africa had a thriving African peasant sector in the early twentieth century, but this was systematically destroyed by the white settler regime on behalf of mine-owners demanding cheap labour and white farmers demanding access to both land and cheap labour.

One such estimate in the mid-1990s found that, among black rural households, 67.7% considered themselves in need of land, with provincial figures ranging from 40% in the Northern Cape and North West to 78.3% in KwaZulu-Natal.

 


source:http://r4d.dfid.gov.uk/PDF/Outputs/ESRC_DFID/60332_Lahiff_Redistributive.pdf.by Edwin Lahiff accessed28/07/16

Is Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) Working?

BEE or Black Economic Empowerment is a tool employed by the South African government supposedly to address the racial injustices of the past and to also redress the economic imbalances created by South Africas past apartheid system.

The other organisations which participated in this alliance included the allies of the ANC, the South African Indian Congress, the South African Congress of Democrats and the Coloured Peoples Congress.

Nelson Mandela’s brand of Black economic empowerment included a complete overhaul of the national economy, where the state decisively intervenes to change the very structures of the economy.

History has it that it was not until 1992 at that conference, Davos at the World Economic Forum when Nelson Mandela finally and completely dropped his pursuit for Black economic empowerment through nationalisation.

Nelson Mandela and the ANC basically told these business people to continue in their ownership of South Africa’s economy and to give to black people whatever crumbs that fall off from their tables.

The reality is that without BEE there would not have been the same level of black participation in the economy, says Martin Kingston of Rothschild, which advises companies on BEE. Pitifully few black South Africans have grown rich by creating entirely new businesses, perhaps because it seems so much easier to make money by acquiring stakes in existing firms.

The collapse in stock prices in 2008 left many would-be tycoons with assets that were worth less than the loans taken out to buy them.

The binding constraint on greater black participation in the economy is education, says Lucy Holborn from the South African Institute of Race Relations, a think-tank that has called for BEE to be scrapped.

The proportion of professionals who are black is 36%, fairly close to the share of degrees held by blacks, which is around 40%.

 

source:http://www.news24.com/MyNews24/BEE-South-Africas-great-injustice-20131106.(2)http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21576655-black-economic-empowerment-has-not-worked-well-nor-will-it-end-soon-fools-gold.

Why does the Minority live better than the Majority?

I really have no time for party politics and for whatever statistics the DA, ANC and others can regurgitate to justify this injustice, it means nothing when the reality is before our eyes!

I really have no time for party politics and for whatever statistics the DA, ANC and others can regurgitate to justify this injustice, it means nothing when the reality is before our eyes!

Despite having our fancy constitution we are content with people living in slum conditions. Oh yes, they are truly grateful for your electrical, water and sanitation connections – so long as they keep within the fence and not be allowed to cross over to our “group areas” – I see the attitudes when a “black” family moves into a “white’ neighbourhood…how it triggers ethnic migration.

Why does the minority have so much of the resources whilst the majority are packed like sardines in their carefully structured confinements?

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The Majority

 

 

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The Minority

A Picture from my day!

On a busy main road this morning I happened to see a common site most South Africans would, to that are the beggars at the traffic junctions. However, I must admit this was my first time witnessing such a desperate and reckless beggar on his knees on a very busy motorway junction.

On a busy main road this morning I happened to see a common site most South Africans would, to that are the beggars at the traffic junctions. However, I must admit this was my first time witnessing such a desperate and reckless beggar on his knees on a very busy motorway junction.

Many of these beggars are not South African, they have come into the country illegally by bribing officers at the border controls. Gilbert (27), a Zimbabwean told me how easy it is to come into South Africa without proper documentation. He mentioned that it usually cost R2500 to bribe the border control officers. Once they arrive in the country – many cannot find jobs and some don’t have enough to find accommodation thereby the parks have become illegal migrant havens to sleep, bathe and congregate.

Many of such individuals have no identity proof, there are no records of their existence in South Africa and thus it is the perfect condition for organised crime. Much of Johannesburg is slowly being taken over by such migrants with dilapidated, unsanitary and informal businesses on the road-side all trying to make a living.

Maxwell’s Spaza Shop…

At the imaginary line between Upper Houghton and Yeoville is Maxwell’s Spaza Shop. There are no clear demarcation of this boundary between these two areas – only the visible signs of the cleaned, treelined streets with huge Mansions and well manicured lawns. As you make the transition into Yeoville, the houses are mostly in disrepair and unkept with shops such as Maxwell’s in front where once a carport or garden.

At the imaginary line between Upper Houghton and Yeoville is Maxwell’s Spaza Shop. There are no clear demarcation of this boundary between these two areas – only the visible signs of the cleaned, treelined streets with huge Mansions and well manicured lawns. As you make the transition into Yeoville, the houses are mostly in disrepair and unkept with shops such as Maxwell’s in front where once a carport or garden.

IMG_0118Maxwell is from Nigeria, and recently moved into the neighbourhood. As I stood chatting with him while he prepared his food to later sell in the evening. The tiled floor dirty, and the large enamel bowl filled with chicken pieces to place on a skewer despite the warm temperature and the absence of hygiene to using gloves, proper counters – Maxwell uses what he has to earn a living.

Loving your neighbour as you love yourself is not the creed in Upper Houghton as much of the locals wishing to segregate themselves from Yeoville. Ignorant and oblivious to the fact that slowly Yeoville is taking over – as property after property is being exchanged to wealthy Nigerians. There are talks of closing the road so that these neighbours don’t contaminate their posh neighbourhoods.

Astonishingly this demarcation is also shared politically of that being ANC and DA. The matter of love and goodwill to ones neighbours are bankrupt in this neighbourhood, for status and wealth are the keys to acceptance.

 

Migrants are bad for South African society and its economy?

The most important reasons behind the prevalence of xenophobia in South Africa are economic and the tendency to criminalise foreigners.

The most important reasons behind the prevalence of xenophobia in South Africa are economic and the tendency to criminalise foreigners.

Existing explanations in terms of economic crises, political transition, relative deprivation, or remnants of apartheid all contain an element of truth but are not in themselves sufficient.

Proclamations from politicians coupled with media reporting on drug syndicates, prostitution and human trafficking, all feed and in turn feed off a popular perception that migrants are bad for South African society and its economy.

It is all too easy for the media and the government to place blame on immigrants for crime, unemployment and housing problems but it is not a long-term solution and, eventually, can only be detrimental for the economy, culture, society and international image of South Africa.

The government faces a pressing need to find a way for citizens and foreigners to live peaceably together and to tackle the problems that xenophobes justify their actions by.

Xenophobia may manifest itself violently through rioting and attacks on foreigners amongst the poorer, black population, but it is an issue for all sectors of South African society and one that is becoming increasingly urgent for the government to address.

Perhaps the most important point to realise is that these misguided feelings of hatred and bitter resentment are based solely on the perception of economic harm and of immigrant involvement in criminal activities, therefore the primary focus for the government must be education and to correct these misperceptions.

 

 

 

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source:http://www.saccps.org/pdf/2-2/SAPSS%202(2)%20Solomon%20&%20Kosaka.pdfaccessed07/05/16

Is South Africa for Sale?

Our people are forgotten and our government have abandoned their own. Where once Whites ruled this land based upon the colour of their skin now the domination is based upon the colour of their money, and our “comrades” are presenting South Africa on the silver platter to the highest bidder and no surprise it’s the Chinese who are the first in line!

More than twenty years of “freedom” for South Africans since becoming a democratic country. Relieved from the oppression of White supremacy so that every citizen is no greater than the other despite creed, race or background.

The “Rainbow Nation” is home to all types of cultures and traditions benefiting from the fruits of this bountiful land, yet you would not need to go far to find the neglected and abandoned “Child of South Africa” – still living in a shack, still having the need for basic essential services such as sanitation and clean water.

Have you ever walked the beautiful streets of Sandton City? Well, behind this affluent and prominent architecture and home to the wealthy lies the Township of Alexandra, home to the rats which are the size of cats and sewage lined streets in contrast to the tree lined suburbia of Houghton or Melrose.

Our people are forgotten and our government have abandoned their own. Where once Whites ruled this land based upon the colour of their skin now the domination is based upon the colour of their money, and our “comrades” are presenting South Africa on the silver platter to the highest bidder and no surprise it’s the Chinese who are the first in line!