7 Steps in Securing a Government Tender

The definition of public procurement encompasses all purchases of goods and services by public institutions in a country, and involves contracts between the government and the private sector in a variety of areas such as health services, the military, construction, etc. Reliable procurement practices transform funds into hospitals, schools and roads.

Procurement accounts for a large part of public resources and thus it is important that the tender procedures occur in an accountable, transparent and well-managed way.

Corruption in public procurement takes away benefits meant for citizens, and lowers the levels of public trust and confidence in the government. It can also be linked to service delivery protests and the erosion of honest competitive bidding.

South Africa loses about R25- to R30-billion of the annual government procurement budget to tender corruption.

The definition of public procurement encompasses all purchases of goods and services by public institutions in a country, and involves contracts between the government and the private sector in a variety of areas such as health services, the military, construction, etc. Reliable procurement practices transform funds into hospitals, schools and roads.
Corruption in public procurement takes away benefits meant for citizens, and lowers the levels of public trust and confidence in the government.

Trends in reports

According to Corruption Watch data, the trends that emerge from submitted reports indicate that:

  • Bribery is rampant in tender processes;
  • Relevant committees indicate a preference for a certain supplier;
  • Tenders are not being advertised or circulated;
  • Dates are altered to accommodate certain suppliers;
  • Appointment of suppliers whose scores do not reflect that they are the best applicants.

The Public Protector has become an increasingly important public watchdog organisation in South Africa, particularly following the judgment by the Constitutional Court on 31 March 2016 on the powers of the Public Protector.

Baqwa has been praised for his contribution to establishing the Office of the Public Protector and raising awareness of the institution, its mandate and services.

Gary Pienaar, a chief investigator in the OPP national office from 1997 to 2002 and in the Western Cape provincial office from 2000 to 2008, notes that Baqwa significantly expanded the investigative skills capacity of staff and initiated an outreach programme that sent investigators into various communities to raise awareness about the OPP and its functions.

He has also been credited for his contribution to Chapter M of the Public Service Regulations, which serves as an administrative guide to ethical and efficient conduct in the public service, as well as with establishing positive relationships with other Chapter 9 institutions and the International Ombudsman Institute.

The then minister of health, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, was accused of misusing public funds and misleading Parliament, and the Public Protector was called on to investigate.

 

 

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source:http://www.corruptionwatch.org.za/understanding-tender-corruption-part-one/accessed15/04/16(2)Think Tenders. Freelance Bid Writing Service and Tender Writer Birmingham(3)http://www.corruptionwatch.org.za/sas-public-protectors-legacies-part-one/accessed15/04/16

Port Shepstone is for Sale!

I’ve just returned for a brief visit recently and to witness how my beloved Port Shepstone now lies in ruins – ethically and socially. She is being raped and abused by her leadership. Those entrusted to care for savage beaches, beautiful landscapes and her treasures have gone mad.

So many residents complain about their Councillors, the bribery, corruption by brokering deals which are for self-interest rather than the greater good of the community. I’m told that much of the leadership is so blinded for self-gain that they have not actually stopped for a moment to see how a vibrant pretty boutique town is turning into a cheap derelict place.

Port Shepstone is on the Southeast coast of South Africa. It is approximately sixty-minutes from Durban by car — boasting some of the most spectacular beaches and varieties of vegetation and of multi-cultural communities as you drive along the coast. This town is special to me for a number of reasons – it’s where I used to take my boat into the Umzimkulu River, despite not knowing how to swim, collecting as many sardines my small hand could grasp as thousands wash up onto our shores every year; it’s where I sat in the bushes munching sugarcane or picking lychee, mangoes and avocados.
Port Shepstone is my hometown and the smell of the humid salty air and familiar horizon of the ocean are likening to a warm blanket comforting me which says, “You are home!”. I remember when Seychelles (the name of a company) which used to sell ice-cream at the Port Shepstone beach and how safe the beach were to just park and watch the waves crush as we shared a meal, or enjoying the ride of a vintage locomotive called the Banana Express.
I’ve just returned for a brief visit recently and to witness how my beloved Port Shepstone now lies in ruins – ethically and socially. She is being raped and abused by her leadership. Those entrusted to care for savage beaches, beautiful landscapes and her treasures have gone mad.
So many residents complain about their Councillors, the bribery, corruption by brokering deals which are for self-interest rather than the greater good of the community. I’m told that much of the leadership is so blinded for self-gain that they have not actually stopped for a moment to see how a vibrant pretty boutique town is turning into a cheap derelict place.
Many can disagree all they want with me, but the truth of the situation is seen by its visitors who have been to my lovely town in the years gone by as ‘the fortune seekers and gold diggers’ whom sworn an oath to protect and serve our town. The astounding nature of these abuses are known by most people in the town, at present they can parade in their new cars and purchase properties in the names of immediate families. Every time our representatives (government officials) participate in corruption and abuse their power, someone is unemployed, someone’s family starves and someone turns to crime. May the blood of the victims be upon our corrupt officials as they turn a blind eye.
I’m hoping that our provincial government would investigate all local government officials, their families and immediate families to understand how is that our local politicians are doing so well financially and what are of those tenders? In addition, when an investigation is underway please be sure that the investigating officer too is not easily purchased – just as the way our town is being sold-off!

Seawater flows from Port Shepstone taps – Why did Ugu municipality not prepare for this?

If you think load-shedding is bad, brace yourself for water-shedding… coming to a tap near you.

tapThousands of residents and holidaymakers on the South Coast woke up to undrinkable salty tap water on Monday as the drought tightened its grip around the province.

The towns and resorts affected by salty tap water include Port Shepstone, Margate and Hibberdene and inland to Bhoboyi. Most local shops had run out of five-litre bottled water stocks before lunch-time as customers raced to stock up.

Lungi Cele, the water services general manager of the Ugu District Municipality, said tap water was likely to remain salty until next Friday while an emergency sand berm was built across the uMzimkulu River to prevent saline water entering the municipal water supply.

She explained that the main water reservoir inland of Port Shepstone had run dry last week, forcing the municipality to pump water from the river. But because of the lack of rain, salty water from the Umzimkulu estuary had moved nearly 10km upstream to the point where water was being pumped from the river to the Bhoboyi treatment works.

While the municipal water was treated with chlorine and contained no traces of harmful bacteria, the treatment process could not remove the salt.

“You can drink it – but we are not recommending it. I tried it. It tastes like seawater,” said Cele.

Sakkie Coetzee, manager of the Margate Sands Beach Resort, said he had managed to buy just over 70 five-litre bottles of fresh water early on Monday.

“We have enough drinking water for our guests tonight (Monday), but I will have to reassess the situation in the morning,” he said.

Jean Whittaker of the Mdoni House guest lodge at Port Shepstone was not so lucky.

“I only managed to get one five-litre bottle and I have 22 people to look after. Now the shops are sold out of bottled water, but we will have to make a plan somehow.”

Dawn Nel of the Tweni Waterfront Guest Lodge said the tap water could still be used for showering, but because it was so salty it was difficult to get enough lather from soap.

“My daughter has been running around trying to find fresh water for her baby’s milk powder formula.”

Wayne Berman, the manager of the Harbour View Super Spar in Port Shepstone, said he managed to get three truckloads of bottled water on Monday, but it had quickly sold out.

The shop was now selling purified reservoir water at R1.50 a litre and customers were still queuing for it late on Monday.

Cele said that with just 28 water tankers, the Ugu District Municipality was battling to supply fresh water to the 30 000 affected households between Hibberdene and Ramsgate. Four major hospitals would get priority supplies

The municipality was getting emergency fresh water supplies via the Mtamvuna water treatment works near Port Edward. But this facility was battling to produce enough water to meet the extra demand from the Port Shepstone region.

As an emergency measure, Ugu had employed contractors to block off the uMzimkulu River about 10km upstream to prevent any further intrusion of saline water.

Once the berm was complete, river water would be pumped into the Bhoboyi reservoir to replenish the municipal water supply.

The municipality had also breached the river mouth in an attempt to drain out saline water near the estuary, but the mouth kept closing because of low water volumes.

“During this period, communities residing between Hibberdene and Ramsgate will be subjected to water with salt content from their taps.

“But the municipality will continuously monitor the water situation in an effort to ensure that water quality standard is not compromised,” the municipality said.

Some high-lying areas inland, including Gamalakhe and Murchison, would have no tap water at all because of high demand on the system.

Municipal authorities on the North coast are to meet National Water Affairs Minister Nomvula Mokonyane on Wednesday to discuss emergency water supply plans in the iLembe District Municipality, which includes Ballito, Salt Rock, Sheffield Beach and Zimbali.

Ilembe mayor Welcome Ndabe warned that there was just 120 days’ supply of water left as the level of Hazelmere Dam continued to drop.

‘The problem is, we do not have enough water tankers. To date iLembe has spent more than R15 million on hiring water tankers.

‘This is costing us R6 000 a day for one water tanker. We are looking at a budget of no less than R300 million to buy our own,’ Ndabe said.

He said the municipality was also getting some water from Mandeni, but there were indications that the uThukela River was ‘steadily running dry’.

‘We are in the process of drilling boreholes where there is groundwater and doing tests to see if the water is fit for human consumption. Should it not be potable then we will look into purchasing treatment plants to avoid our people getting diseases and the like.

‘As things stand, iLembe District Municipality has enough water for about 120 days. It doesn’t look like the weather is about to change, so it is important that we save the little that we have to survive,’ he said.

Source:The Mercury- Tony Carniehttp://beta.iol.co.za/news/south-africa/kwazulu-natal/salty-tap-water-for-south-coast-towns-1939609

WATER CHAOS: Compensation – Don’t be silent!

Clean water supply and drainage of sewage is a service we pay. We have an agreement with the local water company – we pay their charges and expect them to carry out their service in accordance with the terms of their agreement with us (and additional requirement the law places on them). If something goes wrong with these services the disruption of our lives can be significant.

If you face a problem – whether it is over the charges or the service provided the first step is to contact their customer service help-line. If that does not resolve matters to your satisfaction, then you may find a formal complaint procedure. If that does not resolve the dispute, then you may have no option but to take matters further. Whether they will consider mediation or force you to take legal action or small claims service should be able to help you.

Water and sewage disputes

Sewage: If your property has been damaged by sewage you may be entitled to compensation to make good the damage or harm caused.

This would be through a claim against the Director General of Water Services because the water company responsible were negligent by failing to provide and maintain effective drainage. By not maintaining the drains resulting in overflowing sewage they fail in their legal duty of care to the people affected.

Poor water quality: The water company is responsible for the supply of water (up to the point that it connects with your pipes). If you or a visitor to your home becomes ill due to poor water quality being supplied, you should be entitled to compensation. This is usually a claim that the water company were negligent in failing to supply water of a reasonable quality – implying they should know that people drinking it might become ill.

Flooding: Where a water authority is responsible for flooding to your home, you might be entitled to compensation.

Proper water supply and drainage: Where you are a customer of a water company you have a contract with them. In exchange for you paying their charges they must provide a reasonable service. If the service is not reasonable (for example not maintaining the drains or not supplying good quality water) they have breached the terms of the contract. You have the right to demand it be put right and that they pay compensation for your losses and expenses.

What do you have to prove to bring a claim?

1: What damage or harm you have suffered:

This is best shown with photos and a detailed explanation (with relevant dates). Perhaps also collect statements (letters or emails) from other neighbours further providing details of the problems such as overflowing sewage.
2: Why it is the fault of the water company or authority:

Sometimes it will not be possible to say what they have done wrong, In which case you can argue that the damage would not have happened ‘but for’ the water company failing to meet it’s standards and their duty of care owed to you

Sometimes you will have to spend some money on getting an expert’s report to confirm it was the water company’s fault, such as an independent test on the quality of the water supply.

Photos may also support your claim – such as photos of blocked mains drains

3: If you have suffered losses and expenses you will need to show they were caused by the water company and that the amount you are claiming back is reasonable:

  • Photos of damaged property
  • Receipts to prove the cost of repairs or replacements
  • With injury and ill health, make sure you have seen your GP or hospital – so there is an independent record of your medical examination.

Basic services should be the responsibility of the government to plan and warn ahead of time.

Dear Rt Hon “Freedom” Fighter, Politician, Civil Servant, and Gravy-Train Passenger.

Take for example my childhood town in Port Shepstone, I have fond memories of a steam engine train called the “Banana Express”. The train used to take tourists along the beautiful south coast boasting the manicured gardens, well kept public pools and lovely little shops. However once the “freedom” fighters got into power they have turned this garden of a site liken to a dump -yard and constant complaining of the abuses of the “whites’ yet they are willing to watch their town deteriorate so long as their household income is not affected by the plague they are causing.

Dear Rt Hon “Freedom” Fighter, Politician, Minister of Parliament, Civil Servant, and Gravy-Train Passenger,

image1
If you look at the wall you could see the text, “Banana Express”

Why is corruption and embezzlement the way of life for most African government leaders and to whom you are emulating? It seems that there is no shame in being called the dark continent where poverty, wars, corruption, AIDS/HIV, illiteracy and starvation are rampant. Ironically Africa is rich with deposits of oil, gold, diamonds and yet even after centuries of being freed from the dominion of the colonist exploiters, Africa has raised some of its own to further ravage itself. Maybe this is not a colour issue like some make it out to believe, for whether it be black or white the results are the same for the exception that the white-men were not as heartless as many “freedom” fighters believe for they at least built schools, hospitals and infrastructure which is yet evident and in some cases the only evidence of development within South Africa today.

Take for example my childhood town in Port Shepstone, I have fond memories of a steam engine train called the “Banana Express”. The train used to take tourists along the beautiful south coast boasting the manicured gardens, well kept public pools and lovely little shops. However once the “freedom” fighters got into power they have turned this garden of a site liken to a dump -yard and constant complaining of the abuses of the “whites’ yet they are willing to watch their town deteriorate so long as their household income is not affected by the plague they are causing.

Tacky sign board in Port Shepstone advertising Coke
Tacky sign board to Port Shepstone advertising Coke

Memories of my childhood are being eroded whilst a younger generation is growing up in what they are told “has been left by apartheid”. These “freedom” fighters have no longer a cause or struggles, so they are becoming skilled speech makers. Having listened to some of their reasons for the mess they have caused is really quite entertaining. I don’t believe that they listen to themselves and hear the contradictions of the changes to their stories.

image4We watch and see as they dismantle our country, as they strip it apart and sell it off to foreigners. Yet, the delusion is incredible that these very people will tell you the benefits that they have contributed and how rosy life is! Yet much of the majority are talking about you, your new car, your new houses and you luxury holidays. Enjoy it my dear Civil Servants… the masses are coming for you.

STOP Commercial Equipment from being used in the Sardine Run or say goodbye to the Sardines!

The local government should implement by-laws, which protect our marine life to moreover allow the fish, which are also on the run to feast on the event. Instead the greedy opportunists are going to do what the poaches have done to the Rhinos

Growing up in Port Shepstone I have seen the largest shoal in the world wash upon our beaches. I remember hundreds and thousands of people gathering with whatever containers they could find to carrying the fresh catch to take home. For weeks on end the sardines smell of fried, curried, and roasted aromas of the South Coast.

You see, each year on the Eastern Coast of South Africa, in the winter months of June/July, the nutrient rich currents that colder water northwards of the Cape also bring millions of pelagic fish: the staple diet of every predator in the area.

The sardines find their strength in numbers, yet are vulnerable to being forced upwards out of the deep, by sharks and dolphins. They form metamorphosing silver bait-balls at the surface, twisting and dividing to avoid the ocean predators.

Some shoals are driven into the shallows, stranded by the beaches of Kwa Zulu Natal, where local people scoop them up in nets, buckets and skirts: this is what has become known as the sardine run.

sardineCommercial netting operations have been built up around the annual event, with some years more successful than others. Locals mention that traps/weirs are now used to divert the schools into their trawlers rather than have them wash upon the shores. The local government should implement by-laws, which protect our marine life to moreover allow the fish, which are also on the run to feast on the event. Instead the greedy opportunists are going to do what the poaches have done to the Rhinos.

This is a place where man and nature are locked in a titanic struggle for survival. When all of these predators and more are hunting the same shoals, what will it take to keep our oceans alive?

They Stole my IPhone in Port Shepstone!

I had stopped at a local tearoom to buy a drink today. At the checkout I rested my phones on the counter whilst I looked through my pocket for change, I then proceeded to my next meeting. Upon arrival I looked for my IPhone but could not find it. I tried calling it using my other phone to no joy. I traced back down memory lane as to where I could have left the phone. I was uncertain as to whether I left it at the tearoom – so I rushed back thinking on the way, if I questioned the staff, “did you see a IPhone?” they would say “no” of course. So I rehearsed the following,

“Where is my IPhone? I’m giving you four minutes to hand it back as I have evidence it is within this shop – it clearly shows on my GPS.”

I arrived back at the tearoom and parked up, with positivity repeated my demand. The staff denied it – making me feel as if I was mad. I was convinced it was not at this place and that they were telling the truth. I had one last go, “give me your boss’ number I requested – pretending no longer to be interest in the phone.

I walked out and then for some reason, walked straight back in again and approached the Security Guard. He made out some story to which I could not understand. However led me to the back of the shop where he returned my lovely white IPhone.

I called their employer and said, “Sir, it’s not my business but your staff just stole my phone from the counter whilst paying for an item. If they stole from me, they are probably doing the same to you”.

He thanked me and later called to confirm that the cashier and security guard were both fired! You would ask do I feel bad? Don’t be ridiculous! I hope more thieving employees get fired; business owners work hard and sacrifice a lot to earn a living. There are more than 20% of South Africans unemployed!