Apartheid to blame for COVID-19???

Apartheid has been the scapegoat for much of what is wrong with our country today however regrettably Corona sees no colour nor past… and it is coming for our people

Have you walked down the streets of Alexandra or similar townships that the luxury of having your neighbour at bay of 2m is only for the rich? Twenty plus years ago should have prepared our greatest commodity – that being our labour force with better homes and services. South Africans living in townships will be worst affected with cramped taxis and taxi ranks with no choice for the commuters to be placed like pawns for a battle.

Many have a poor nutrimental diet with high starch meals, very little fresh fruit and vegetables. We should be heartbroken as a majority of our people are put to be sacrificed by this pandemic. Much of what has been advised by the government is the washing of hands and social distancing.  However, it must have been twenty years or so since our celebrity politicians visited the townships to realise that some don’t have clean running water nor physically able to distance themselves due to the cramp living conditions.

During the SONA and private functions we see our millionaire politicians who made their wealth after coming to office. It is only a handful of whom actually built their wealth from their ingenuity, yet they have forgotten the plight of our people. Apartheid has been the scapegoat for much of what is wrong with our country today however regrettably Corona sees no colour nor past… and it is coming for our people!

SONA 2020

Making Crooks Celebrities

Many a time we are so focused on the material possession that we fail to ask the simple question: “But you are a Councillor, a civil servant – how is it that you could afford such a vehicle?” As a kid, I remember my mum seeing that I was chewing a sweet so she enquired where I got it from? Sheepishly I made up a story – after much of a beating and interrogating I confessed I stole it!

There was a time when an uncle of mine bought a brand new Volkswagen Cii Golf. I’m certain that many will have the spatial awareness to realise that the car is not really huge and is ideal for four and okay for five small built persons. However, my uncle and his family were so excited that it did not really matter. Even for the extended families too who can also have a ride around the block for the novelty of being in a new car was exhilarating. We were all so proud of our uncle’s achievement, we celebrated with their family and was allowed to share in their happiness.

Things have changed somewhat a lot since the good-old days when working hard was rewarded by “good things”. These days, instead of celebrating and share in others’ happiness, we covet, become envious and can’t wait to up-show all that we have arrived.

Many a time we are so focused on the material possession that we fail to ask the simple question: “But you are a Councillor, a civil servant – how is it that you could afford such a vehicle?” As a kid, I remember my mum seeing that I was chewing a sweet so she enquired where I got it from? Sheepishly I made up a story – after much of a beating and interrogating I confessed I stole it!

Boy, did my bottom burn! Therefore likewise within our communities are individuals we know are bluntly crooks in fancy gear and fancy footwork showing how successful they are… In fact many are stealing, involved in corruption and crooking.

Many know that there are individuals who have accumulated their wealth from immoral dealings. Since when did we condone or look up to the immoral, self-centred ones? As the very reason we have unemployment, crime and lack of delivery of services, it is because someone has a connection to the backhander. Enough is enough!  I’m tired of seeing beggars and unemployed people making me feel guilty when public funds are going to private bank accounts – I have an issue!

Stop making crooks celebrities in South Africa and see them for what they truly are!

Authoritarian and democratic leaders alike are passing laws that are strengthening official powers to regulate the online content of private users.

Problematic new laws are emerging in democratic and authoritarian countries alike. Democratic states have struggled to draft legislation that adequately balances legitimate priorities like counterterrorism with the protection of citizens’ rights online. Countries with effective democratic institutions allow for public consultation and correction when laws infringe on fundamental freedoms.

New laws criminalised online dissent and legitimised over broad surveillance and data collection, while more people are being arrested for legitimate online activities than ever before.

Authoritarian and democratic leaders alike believe the internet is ripe for regulation and passed laws that strengthen official powers to police online content, said Sanja Kelly, project director for Freedom on the Net. The scramble to legislate comes at the expense of user rights, as lawmakers deliberately or misguidedly neglect privacy protections and judicial oversight.

More people are being arrested for their internet activity than ever before, online media outlets are increasingly pressured to censor themselves or face legal penalties, and private companies are facing new demands to comply with government requests for data or deletions.

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Between May 2013 and May 2014,      41 countries passed or proposed legislation to penalise legitimate forms of speech online, increase government powers to control content, or expand government surveillance capabilities.

In Ethiopia, a new cybersecurity law states that social-media outlets, blogs, and other internet-related media have great capabilities to instigate war, to damage the countrys image, and create havoc in the economic atmosphere of the country.

The law empowers the government to investigate computers, networks, internet sites, radio and television stations, and social-media platforms for any possible damage to the countrys social, economic, political, and psychological well-being.

In the Middle East, Jordan broadened its definition of illegal terrorist activities to include acts that could damage the countrys relations with foreign countries, including the online publication of critical commentary on foreign leaders.

In Kenya, a new information and communications law signed in December 2013 gave the government-appointed regulator vaguely defined new powers, including the authority to impose punitive fines on both journalists and media houses for alleged ethical violations.

Content blocking without a court order: Measures that empowered government agencies to block content without judicial oversight and with little or no transparency were especially notable in five countries-Turkey, Thailand, Russia, Kazakhstan, and Italy.

In Turkey, after audio recordings implicating highlevel officials in a corruption scandal were leaked on YouTube and SoundCloud, new legal measures empowered the state regulator to block websites without a court order in cases that violate privacy or are considered “Discriminatory or insulting.” The regulator later blocked YouTube to suppress an unverified recording of a national security meeting. President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who was prime minister at the time, has vowed to “Wipe out Twitter” and called social media the “Worst menace to society.”

In Thailand, judicial oversight is legally required when web content is blocked, but court orders from the past year undermined that requirement, allowing information officials to block web pages that are “Similar” to those specified in the order without seeking separate permission. The situation worsened following the May 2014 coup, as military leaders issued censorship directives under martial law, blocking more than 200 pages in the week after they seized power.

In late 2013, for example, the research and advocacy group Greatfire.org began hosting content that is banned by the Chinese government on “unblockable” domains owned by Amazon and other major companies, which officials cannot risk censoring because of their large commercial footprint within China.

Restrictions targeting expression on social media were particularly draconian in Vietnam. Decree 72, enacted in September 2013, extended prohibitions against political or social commentary from blogs to all social-networking sites.

Criminal defamation laws are especially problematic given the ease with which casual remarks on social-media platforms can be targeted by officials for reprisal. In January 2014, a Zimbabwean user was arrested for calling President Robert Mugabe “an idiot” on his Facebook page.

 

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source:https://freedomhouse.org/article/freedom-net-2014-new-controls-arrests-drive-internet-freedom-declineaccessed7/03/2016 (2)

Future President of South Africa? – Don’t misjudge Julius Malema for a fool

Many people make jokes about Mr Malema and his incoherent rhetoric, his educational background and obliviousness nature in dealing with allegations. People laugh at his uniform and protests. However I’m afraid that Mr Malema would soon have the last laugh.

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Many people make jokes about Mr Malema and his incoherent rhetoric, his educational background and obliviousness nature in dealing with allegations. People laugh at his uniform and protests. However I’m afraid that Mr Malema would soon have the last laugh.

Peruse through his curriculum vitae below and see that this is not your “garden-boy”. He is ambitious and his ideologies are controversial. He deliberately captures and spins the media to his bidding. He has been strategic and cautious in choosing his battles- given that 2013 may have not been the best year for him. This morning’s news article mentions: “The opposition Economic Freedom Fighters, which has contested very few by-elections since its launch as a political party, will take part in by-elections in KwaZulu-Natal for the first time on Wednesday.” If Mr Malema is such a fool then how is it that he appears to be recently the voice of reason. The voice which is speaking the people’s language, this may well be the people spokesmen! He has some seriously controversial policies, which can be liken to the leaders of Zimbabwe, Kenya and Uganda, and to that just may result in the South African economy being destroyed. But is that a bad thing? Should monetary gain be the greater importance in comparison to an entire nation? Should not the mines and commodities of South Africa belong to the people of South Africa? Or the land of the homeless to reclaim property to which had been plundered? At present everyone is mentioning the symptoms of a bad managed government however Mr Malema is brave enough to express his radical ideas for change. The politicians in their lovely suits and entourage are too busy being pampered while Mr Malema is in his overall working hard to be the President of South Africa. Given that the GDP & GNP may decline, that inflation may increase and that food scarcity and foreign aid may diminish. Given that foreigners may have to leave and that Indians, Whites, and Coloured may fall at the hands of a radical for who needs skill when equality and justice means more than money?

The CV of the future President of South Africa:

CURRENT POSITION (S)
Founder Member | Economic Freedom Fighters
May 2013 – present
Social Development and Community Services

Commander in Chief | Economic Freedom Fighters
2013 – present
Publishing, Printing and Print Media

PREVIOUS POSITION(S)
President | Youth League | African National Congress
South Africa | 2008 – 2012
Government, Public Administration and Defence

National President | Congress of South African Students
South Africa | 2001
Government, Public Administration and Defence

Provincial Chairman | Limpopo | Congress of South African Students
South Africa | 1997 – 2001
Government, Public Administration and Defence

General Secretary | Youth League – Limpopo Branch | African National Congress
South Africa | 1995 – 2012
Government, Public Administration and Defence

Regional Chairman | Seshego Branch | African National Congress Youth League
South Africa | 1995 – 2012
Government, Public Administration and Defence

EDUCATIONAL HISTORY
SECONDARY
Mohlakaneng High School, Limpopo, South Africa

TERTIARY
University of South Africa
2011 – present
Bachelor of Arts degree – Communications and African languages
University of South Africa
2008 – 2010
Two-year diploma – Youth Development