Why Are we not Free?

What has happened to the aspirations of Madiba’s vision? How is it possible that in such a short period of time, after we had vowed never to return to the land labelled by racial identity and yet the very reality and tragedy of our present is having to address the racial tension which is dividing our country?

 

At the Annual Nobel Peace Prize, Nelson Mandela said,

“At the southern tip of the continent of Africa, a rich reward is in the making, an invaluable gift is in the preparation, for those who suffered in the name of all humanity when they sacrificed everything — for liberty, peace, human dignity and human fulfilment.

This reward will not be measured in money. Nor can it be reckoned in the collective price of the rare metals and precious stones that rest in the bowels of the African soil we tread in the footsteps of our ancestors. It will and must be measured by the happiness and welfare of the children, at once the most vulnerable citizens in any society and the greatest of our treasures.

The children must, at last, play in the open field, no longer tortured by the pangs of hunger or ravaged by disease or threatened with the scourge of ignorance, molestation and abuse, and no longer required to engage in deeds whose gravity exceeds the demands of their tender years.

In front of this distinguished audience, we commit the new South Africa to the relentless pursuit of the purposes defined in the World Declaration on the Survival, Protection and Development of Children.

The reward of which we have spoken will and must also be measured by the happiness and welfare of the mothers and fathers of these children, who must walk the earth without fear of being robbed, killed for political or material profit, or spat upon because they are beggars.

They too must be relieved of the heavy burden of despair which they carry in their hearts, born of hunger, homelessness and unemployment.

The value of that gift to all who have suffered will and must be measured by the happiness and welfare of all the people of our country, who will have torn down the inhuman walls that divide them.

These great masses will have turned their backs on the grave insult to human dignity which described some as masters and others as servants, and transformed each into a predator whose survival depended on the destruction of the other”. 

What has happened to the aspirations of Madiba’s vision? How is it possible that in such a short period of time, after we had vowed never to return to the land labelled by racial identity and yet the very reality and tragedy of our present is having to address the racial tension which is dividing our country?

Why are we are so focused on our racial differences? Why are we so sensitive to trust or be free?

Although many have had to sacrifice for the prized Constitution South Africa portrays as the achievement yet many still believe to be imprisoned by injustice and racial inequality. I hear the Whites and the Western world so clearly reminding those who “feel” injustice that Apartheid has been dismantled and that the Law recognises that no one group enjoys privilege above all others. South Africa enjoys freedom of belief and opinion, which means that we are free to follow the dictates of conscience but in practice, how true is this?

 

Here are six ways Mandela changed his country:

The difference between a selfless leader – in comparison to a selfish leader?

Forsaking bloodshed

The renunciation of violence was one of the defining moments of the political process, and earned Mandela and de Klerk the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize.

Forging a political path

The transition formally turned South Africa into a democracy, bringing in one of the world’s most progressive constitutions and allowing blacks not only into polling booths, but also into the corridors of power.

In doing so, South Africa also lost its global pariah status. Apartheid had been punished by sanctions including a trade embargo and a ban on direct flights to dozens of countries, like the United States.

A global player

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become “a rainbow nation” that would never again be seen as “the skunk of the world.”

He said: “We enter into a covenant that we shall build a society in which all South Africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts, assured of their inalienable right to human dignity – a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.”

Peace and forgiveness

Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions. Key to this was his 1995 establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission that investigated historic human rights violations and gave vent to grievances.

A cultural power

That same year, South Africa hosted the Rugby World Cup – the first event of its kind to be held there since the end of the apartheid-era sporting boycott. Along with cricket, rugby was a game played and enjoyed almost exclusively by whites, making the event tough for Mandela’s fledgling democratic government to “sell” to a wider population.

Despite resistance on both sides, Mandela swung the rainbow nation behind both the team – the Springboks – and the tournament, which South Africa won. That achievement, documented in the 2009 film “Invictus” starring Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon, illustrated the extent of South Africa’s rehabilitation and also set the country back on the path of sporting success.

A generous soul

Mandela’s other key legacy is his extensive charitable work, including the creation of the Nelson Mandela Foundation, the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and 46664 – the HIV-AIDS initiative named after his prison number. In 2009, the United Nations declared that July 18, Mandela’s birthday, would be a worldwide day of community service known as Nelson Mandela International Day.

 

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Source:http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/7-ways-nelson-mandela-changed-south-africa-f2D11702722accessed 10/03/15

South Africa is in the grips of its most serious economic and political crisis.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

The African National Congress, the liberation party –  ruling South Africa since 1994 – when the country elected its first post-apartheid government under the great Nelson Mandela. Almost two decades have passed since the end of legalised racial segregation in South Africa, yet the abolition of apartheid remains the biggest legacy of Nelson Mandela. The 1993 assassination of ANC figurehead Chris Hani by right-wing white extremists heightened fears that the country was destined for a racial blood bath, but Mandela issued an appeal:

Now is the time for all South Africans to stand together against those who, from any quarter, wish to destroy what Chris Hani gave his life for the freedom of all of us.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

Yet President Jacob Zuma’s government have taken an authoritarian and corrupt turn- at the very moment the country needs bold and honest leadership. Weak governance is preventing it from making critical policy choices and public investments to improve social welfare and realise Mandela’s dream of a multiracial “Rainbow nation.” It is also undercutting South Africa’s capacity to lead both in Africa and on the global stage.

 

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source:http://allafrica.com/view/group/main/main/id/00040383.htmlaccessed10/03/16-2.http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/7-ways-nelson-mandela-changed-south-africa-f2D11702722/accessed 10/03/16