A time for us to remember – Lest we forget

Among the first to be killed was 13-year old Hector Pieterson. The photograph of a local boy carrying his body, with Pieterson’s sister at his side, sparked international outrage when it was printed in newspapers around the world the following day.

South Africans are celebrating four decades since the 1976 Soweto uprising.

An estimated 176 school children were shot and killed by the apartheid regime for marching against the enforcement of Afrikaans in schools.

High school students started to encourage each other to take part in a protest march against the apartheid governments decision to force schools to teach all subjects in Afrikaans.

Many Soweto residents today still salute the youth of 1976 for their contribution to todays South Africa.

There are no longer separate spaces for white and black people, said Oupa Moloto, one of the students who marched in the uprising, who is now a coordinator of the June 1976 Foundation Project in Soweto.

He says South Africa and Soweto in particular are better places today because of the sacrifice made by the youth of 1976.

 


source:http://www.dw.com/en/remembering-soweto-40-years-on-educational-inequality-remains/a-19332019?.

Don’t Incite Hatred to our Youth on this Youth Day!

I have recently come to realise that this notion is true and that some parents, teachers, political influencers and leaders in our communities are irresponsible by teaching our youths to hate and continue the struggle.

EFF and Zuma’s Cabinet are contributors to this ideology and a need to grow-up. The EFF are wearing red overalls and berets yet driving the latest German engineering (Grow up!). It is not anyone’s time, it is our country and it’s our time to act responsibly. Stop those in authority preaching their political prejudices by brainwashing our youths!

It’s clear that the wounds of apartheid are still raw in some of our people. Some can’t let go of the pains and anger, which have cost them great sacrifices so that this new South Africa can be formed – as one nation despite colour. However, the novelty of South Africa’s newness is slowly wearing-out and true emotions of hurt are yet again beginning to fester. The colours black and white are becoming more visible due to some of the unfair Policies Mr Zuma’s cabinet imposing on our nation to distinguish colour.

auMany of the young people who have not experienced injustice have taken it upon their stride to seek retribution. There is anger and hatred towards the oppressors of the past. Zuma’s administration has demonstrated that Madiba’s and Tutu’s philosophy of forgiveness and reconciliation showed weakness as opposed to the dominating of South Africa – so that the Whites, Indians, Asians and Coloureds all know that South Africa is not their land.

Being African is a current trend and we all want to show that we are – but the term, “African” can be ambiguous. It has subtly the connotation of the exclusivity towards the “native descendants of the Bantu”.

I have recently come to realise that this notion is true and that some parents, teachers, political influencers and leaders in our communities are irresponsible by teaching our youths to hate and continue the struggle.

EFF and Zuma’s Cabinet are contributors to this ideology and a need to grow-up. The EFF are wearing red overalls and berets yet driving the latest German engineering (Grow up!). It is not anyone’s time, it is our country and it’s our time to act responsibly. Stop those in authority preaching their political prejudices by brainwashing our youths!