Dear Mr President, come take a walk with me?

Dear Mr President, come take a walk with me?

Dear His Excellency the President of South Africa

Sir, when people say that you are single-handedly destroying this country – I say nonsense, if you get to see what millions see every day of the incompetent staff at the utility companies, lazy councillors and those who think too highly of themselves trying to re-enact the accusations you were charged now rubbishing your legacy of invincibility.

Dear His Excellency the President of South Africa,

Humble citizen I am have decided to publicly apologise for doubting your intellect and qualifications. You do not realise it, but you are teaching us all of your supernatural powers to overcome all obstacles. Despite what others are throwing on your path – you show resilience and tenacity of a Zulu Warrior. I’m sure that Shaka must be looking down at you and learning a few manoeuvres himself hoping to apply it possibly in his next life.

Sir, when people say that you are single-handedly destroying this country – I say nonsense, if you get to see what millions see every day of the incompetent staff at the utility companies, lazy councillors and those who think too highly of themselves trying to re-enact the accusations you were charged now rubbishing your legacy of invincibility.

These groups of people who run the municipalities are the reason this country is failing! They work half day and move at a pace of slow, dead and died! So no, we cannot blame you, this would be unfair for those that run the country think they are you!

There can only be one Mr One!

I go around Africa and people ask me very embarrassing questions

“I go around Africa and people ask me very embarrassing questions about this Parliament.

“I am happy that you were able to handle the House but commenting as somebody who from time to time comes to this House to participate I believe the house needs to do more to bring this house to order,” he said in his reply to the budget vote debate on the presidency.

“I go around Africa and people ask me very embarrassing questions about this Parliament.

“I thought you should know this, some are complaining particularly in this region that in the manner in which we behave in Parliament, we are changing the perceptions they have heard about us, that we are a leading example of the constitutional democracy. They are now saying you are influencing some of their people in a wrong way.”

South African Parliament in chaos again

Several EFF MPs appeared to be harshly manhandled. One bouncer could be seen holding an MP in a lock around his neck while EFF MP Nazier Paulsen who tried to fight back was also harshly dealt with.

President Jacob Zumas first appearance in parliament since the courts made two damning rulings against him got off to a bumpy start on Wednesday when rowdy EFF members were ejected from the National Assembly.

The EFF wrote a letter to speaker Baleka Mbete asking that Zuma not be allowed to speak in the National Assembly as he had violated the Constitution and also faced the reinstatement of corruption charges.

In the first court ruling against Zuma the Constitutional Court found that Zuma had failed to uphold respect and defend the Constitution.

EFF leader Julius Malema vowed after the ruling that Zuma would not be allowed to address parliament.

The second court ruling by the North Gauging High Court found the National Prosecuting Authority was wrong to drop fraud corruption and racketeering charges against him relating to the arms deal.

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source:http://www.timeslive.co.za/politics/2016/05/04/WATCH-Fists-fly-as-EFF-members-are-violently-removed-from-Parliament

Do Black People Enjoy Suffering?

Why do Black people show loyalty and dedication to their own yet their own show no care and will abandoned them, left for dead without delivery of services whilst the other races can receive by paying for it…but if you don’t have money what and how can you receive such benefits? But should essential services be considered benefits or is it not a Rights? Then why are not the Black communities protesting? Or should I be asking the question… do Black people enjoy suffering?

At University I was taught a very important lesson from a very wise professor saying that if I ask the right questions, I would be able to get the right responses which will contribute to a fuller understanding. So there are some questions which are bugging me and to which I’m having difficulties understanding. However I’m also having difficulties formulating my questions so here are my thoughts and along the way I will try to ask the right questions?

From my various travels to many countries I have had the opportunity to observe their lifestyles and culture, I have also come to realise “Black people” suffer prejudice almost everywhere. Whether it is in Europe, Asia or the Americas – black people have it difficult. I don’t particularly like using the term, “Black people” but my vocabulary in describing this particular group of people as “African” would be incorrect as I’m an African and I’m not Black but nonetheless you get the idea.

So to move on, I find that this particular race has had a difficult history and is currently also having a somewhat prejudiced and disadvantaged life. In South Africa, Black people have waited patiently for years to be able to be free from the oppression of “White Supremacy” and to many believed to have been their biggest constraining factor to liberation and prosperity.

However twenty years on and we have had three Black Presidents and yet there are still injustices which deprive Black people from achieving their full potential. As I drove-by Braamfortein yesterday in order to verify a news article noting that a rat was tested positive for having a plague due to the bin-collector strike. I saw the piles of refuse lined the streets whilst the green and stagnant liquid pools filled the pavement and to which school children having to walk on the roads.

I have not seen a problem escalate to this level in other neighbourhoods. Orange Grove did have a similar issue however after much complaining from a literate community their streets were cleaned. So why do the poor black communities have to endure such conditions? IMG_0189

Is this due to money or colour of skin? Yet in a democracy I believe that we all should be equal in the eyes of the Law and therefore why doesn’t the Black people protest against the poor delivery of services within their neighbourhoods? Why do they still vote for a Government which continues to abandon them and leave them without proper water, sanitation, education and medical services? There are many Non-profit organisations fulfilling the Governments obligations and creating opportunities for Black people, should this not be the governments responsibility?

Would education make a difference? Yet we have recently witnessed the President of South Africa violating the Constitution to which serves to protect its people. Education is not lacking  within the Government Cabinet and yet the majority will vote for the same oppressor to govern and the Cabinet will continue to support abuses to the Black people. Why do Black people show loyalty and dedication to their own yet their own show no care and will abandoned them, left for dead without delivery of services whilst the other races can receive by paying for it…but if you don’t have money what and how can you receive such benefits? But should essential services be considered benefits or is it not a Right?  Then why are not the Black communities protesting?

Or should I be asking the question… do Black people enjoy suffering?

“I appeal to our President to submit to the will of the people and resign”

Comrade President, are you aware that your outstanding contribution to the liberation struggle stands to be severely tarnished if the remainder of your term as President continues to be dogged by crises and a growing public loss of confidence in the ANC and government as a whole. I know that if I were in the President’s shoes, I would step down with immediate effect. I believe that is what would help the country to find its way out of a path that it never imagined it would be on, but one that it must move out of soon.

Dear Comrade President Zuma 

I have agonised for a while before writing this letter to you. 

I am just a rank-and-file member of my ANC Branch. However, even before the ANC opened its membership to non-Africans in the 1969. I was involved in the activities of the ANC, the South African Indian Congress, the SACP and Umkhonto we Sizwe. 

  • In the Defiance Campaign Trial of 1952, I was among the 20 accused who were sentenced to 9 months imprisonment, suspended for 2 years. 
  • In the Treason Trial- 1956-1961. Of the original 156 accused, I was among the last 30 who were finally acquitted in 1961. 
  • In the 1963-1964 Rivonia Trial I was among the 8 accused sentenced to Life Imprisonment. Together with Comrade Walter Sisulu and others I was released in 1989. Comrade Madiba was released about 4 months later. 

I am immensely grateful to the ANC for the privilege of serving on the first NEC after its unbanning. In 1997, I stepped down. I also benefited from the experience of serving for one term as Parliamentary Counsellor to President Mandela, after which I stepped down. 

I am of course aware that this does not automatically bestow on me the right to address this letter to the President. 

However, in all these years it never occurred to me that the time would come when I would feel obliged to express my concerns to the Honourable President. It is, therefore, painful for me to write this letter to you. I have been a loyal and disciplined member of the ANC and broader Congress movement since the 1940s. 

I have always maintained a position of not speaking out publicly about any differences I may harbour against my leaders and my organisation, the ANC. I would only have done so when I thought that some important organisational matters compel me to raise my concerns. 

Today I have decided to break with that tradition. 

The position of President is one that must at all times unite this country behind a vision and programme that seeks to make tomorrow a better day than today for all South Africans. It is a position that requires the respect of all South Africans, which of course must be earned at all times. 

I did not speak out against Nkandla although I thought it wrong to have spent public money for any President’s private comfort. I did not speak out though I felt it grossly insulting when my President is called a “thief” or a “rapist”; or when he is accused of being “under the influence of the Guptas”. I believed that the NEC would have dealt with this as the collective leadership of the ANC. 

When I learnt of the dismissal of Minister Nene and the speculated reasons for this I became very worried. I’m fully aware, it is accepted practice that the appointment and dismissal of Ministers is the prerogative of the President. This might be technically correct but in my view it is against the best traditions of our movement. My concern was amplified when it emerged that the Deputy Finance Minister reported that he was offered the Finance Minister post by members of the Gupta family. The people’s interest must at all times remain supreme.In this instance it was clearly not the case. The resultant crisis that the country was plunged into was clearly an indication that the removal of the Minister was not about the interests of the people. 

The unanimous ruling of the Constitutional Court on the Nkandla matter has placed me in an introspective mode and I had to ask myself some very serious and difficult questions. Now that the court has found that the President failed to uphold, defend and respect the Constitution as the supreme law, how should I relate to my President? 

If we are to continue to be guided by growing public opinion and the need to do the right thing, would he not seriously consider stepping down? 

I am not a political analyst, but I am now driven to ask: “Dear Comrade President, don’t you think your continued stay as President will only serve to deepen the crisis of confidence in the government of the country?” 

And bluntly, if not arrogantly; in the face of such persistently widespread criticism, condemnation and demand, is it asking too much to express the hope that you will choose the correct way that is gaining momentum, to consider stepping down? 

If not, Comrade President, are you aware that your outstanding contribution to the liberation struggle stands to be severely tarnished if the remainder of your term as President continues to be dogged by crises and a growing public loss of confidence in the ANC and government as a whole. 

I know that if I were in the President’s shoes, I would step down with immediate effect. I believe that is what would help the country to find its way out of a path that it never imagined it would be on, but one that it must move out of soon. 

To paraphrase the famous MK slogan of the time, “There comes a time in the life of every nation when it must chose to submit or fight”. Today I appeal to our President to submit to the will of the people and resign. 

Yours comradely

Ahmed M Kathrada 

31st March, 2016.

 

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source:http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2016-04-02-ahmed-kathrada-i-appeal-to-our-president-to-submit-to-the-will-of-the-people-and-resign/?#.Vv914scZfdk accessed 2/04/16 Picture:http://www.ciibroadcasting.com/2013/05/08/ahmed-kathrada-israel-must-be-isolated-now/ accessed 2/04/16

Our African Al Capone – His Excellency, The Right honorable, The President of South Africa!

Al Capone is one of the most notorious American gangsters of the 20th century. I believe that our Right Honourable Mr President Zuma is even stronger than feather weight Al Capone. However what is common between both men is the fact that they both got stuck at the taxes. For Al Capone it was his personal unpaid taxes; but who can trump our very own heavy-weight Champion of the World, His Excellency, the President of South Africa for he took the people’s taxes and spent it on himself!
His previous winnings included the fight of approximately some seven hundred charges, he survived the Gupta scandal, he overcame the non-confidence vote. He is a fighter and now the Highest Court in South Africa has ruled that he violated the constitution when he failed to repay government money spent on his private residence. This ruling is believed to be a victory for the opposition, who said they would push for His Excellency’s impeachment. Nonsense!! 

Zuma is untouchable and the Cabinet is all behind this Champion – who dares to touch him will result in a cabinet shuffle. Not surprising that in the Government statement it said the President would “reflect” on the judgement and take “appropriate action”.

A spokeswoman for the governing African National Congress said the party’s top six officials, who include Mr Zuma and his deputy Cyril Ramaphosa, would meet to discuss the implications of the ruling. Of course Zuma’s henchmen know how to show that they are dealing with the issue – instead our African Al Capone is possibly saying, “Come on guys, don’t quit now… Just one more deal and we will let them see the rainbows while we retire with the Guptas!”
It took a court hearing to discover that our President had “unduly benefited” from the renovations and should repay a portion of the government money, the Public Prosecutor said however we all knew years back that there was a heist.
He then went on to say that Mr Zuma’s failure to repay the money was “inconsistent” with the constitution, he added, “The president failed to uphold, defend and respect the constitution.” We all know that who will be looking for a new job soon… Any opening for Public Prosecutor in Syria?

Mr Mogoeng further dug his grave by adding that public officials ignored the constitution at their peril, and should remember that the rule of law was the “sharp and mighty sword that stands ready to chop the ugly head of impunity from its stiffened neck”.

This ain’t over yet! Zuma Will be Back!!!

South Africa is in the grips of its most serious economic and political crisis.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

The African National Congress, the liberation party –  ruling South Africa since 1994 – when the country elected its first post-apartheid government under the great Nelson Mandela. Almost two decades have passed since the end of legalised racial segregation in South Africa, yet the abolition of apartheid remains the biggest legacy of Nelson Mandela. The 1993 assassination of ANC figurehead Chris Hani by right-wing white extremists heightened fears that the country was destined for a racial blood bath, but Mandela issued an appeal:

Now is the time for all South Africans to stand together against those who, from any quarter, wish to destroy what Chris Hani gave his life for the freedom of all of us.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

Yet President Jacob Zuma’s government have taken an authoritarian and corrupt turn- at the very moment the country needs bold and honest leadership. Weak governance is preventing it from making critical policy choices and public investments to improve social welfare and realise Mandela’s dream of a multiracial “Rainbow nation.” It is also undercutting South Africa’s capacity to lead both in Africa and on the global stage.

 

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source:http://allafrica.com/view/group/main/main/id/00040383.htmlaccessed10/03/16-2.http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/7-ways-nelson-mandela-changed-south-africa-f2D11702722/accessed 10/03/16

Could Mrs Zuma be the next President of South Africa?

Ms Dlamini-Zuma’s fans often say that “South Africa is ready for a woman president.” Would she be any good? Her record in government is not exactly impressive. Susan Booysen, author of the book “Dominance and Decline: The ANC in theTime of Zuma”, predicts that she would be much like her ex-husband.

zumaThere is talk that His Excellency the President of South Africa, Jacob Zuma seems to be wondering how to share custody of the country with his ex-wifeMr Zuma must retire as South Africa’s president in 2019A quiet race is under way to pick the next president of the ruling partythe African National Congress.

Mr Zuma faced 783 charges of corruptionfraudmoney-laundering and tax evasion before he became presidentMr Zuma’s critics speculate that he wants his ex-wife at the helm as an ally to argue that the charges-which he claims are politically motivated-should never see the light of dayThe odds of another Zuma running South Africa are hard to gauge.

At the COSATU national congress in late November several unions openly backed Mr Ramaphosasaying that the deputy president of the ANC should succeed as party presidentas in the pastMr Ramaphosa stands to benefit from the mess Mr Zuma has made of the country’s credit rating.

In December the president replaced a respected finance minister with an unknown backbencherspooking the marketsMs Dlamini-Zuma’s fans often say that “South Africa is ready for a woman president.” Would she be any goodHer record in government is not exactly impressive. Susan Booysenauthor of the book “Dominance and DeclineThe ANC in theTime of Zuma“, predicts that she would be much like her ex-husband.

I think Zuma is going to be with us long after he has actually left office,” says Ms BooysenMr Zuma may not be able to name his own successor, howeverMr Zuma often giggles throughout his questions in Parliament for the yeardespite the serious issues before hima severe droughtan economy close to recession and reports that taxpayers are to fork out for a brand-new4 billion-rand presidential jet

 

 

 

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source: 1.picture-http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/WO-AK427_AFUNIO_P_20120715175528.jpg/ 2.content:http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21685324-giving-presidency-his-ex-wife-might-be-jacob-zumas-best-shot-avoiding?zid=304&ah=e5690753dc78ce91909083042ad12e30