Emerging markets can tap the Potential of digital in the food chain

Emerging markets can tap the potential of digital in the food chain through innovations such as precision agriculture, supply-chain efficiencies, and agriculture-focused payment systems.

Emerging markets can tap the potential of digital in the food chain through innovations such as precision agriculture, supply-chain efficiencies, and agriculture-focused payment systems.

Precision agriculture is a technology-enabled approach to farming management that observes, measures, and analyzes the needs of individual fields and crops.

Soil sensors and aerial images help farmers manage crop growth centrally, with automated detection systems providing early warnings of deviations from expected growth rates or quality.

Transport times can be cut in half by using smart meters to improve routing.

Coupling transport-management systems with agricultural sensors can allow unified hauling of inbound transportation, generating average savings of 10 to 20 percent.







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 source:http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/digital-mckinsey/our-insights/how-big-data-will-revolutionize-the-global-food-chainbyClarisse Magnin

The relationship between big business and the government in South Africa

In the years ahead, we should see business stepping up with innovative solutions rather than waiting for government to impose policies such as black economic empowerment or, worse still, being caught out in scandals of collusion, as have been seen in the construction sector and even the bread industry.

South African companies need to acknowledge their role in apartheid and apply their resources to the challenges of today.

Had they taken that opportunity to reflect on their role in a fundamentally unfair system and, coming out of that process, to institutionalise the necessary changes, they would be playing a much more meaningful role in the transformation of South Africa today.

The relationship between big business and the government would also be in a far healthier state than it is, 21 years after we achieved democracy.

For example, when US presidents visit another country, they never fail to take with them a representative from a big American company, such as GE or Boeing.

Even though the US government isn’t a shareholder in those businesses, the president backs them from a distance when he makes a state visit.

In the years ahead, we should see business stepping up with innovative solutions rather than waiting for government to impose policies such as black economic empowerment or, worse still, being caught out in scandals of collusion, as have been seen in the construction sector and even the bread industry.

 

 

 

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source: Reimagining South Africa, edited by McKinsey & Company.http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/middle-east-and-africa/its-time-for-south-african-business-to-step-upaccessed19/04/16

Rapid Surge in Waste Volumes

Current waste management legislation in South Africa does not require landfill owners or recyclers to keep accurate records regarding e-waste volumes. Keith Anderson, chairman of eWASA believes that e-waste recycling rates in South Africa are improving but are not at an international standard yet due to poor education and the high cost of e-waste recycling plants.

Growing economic prosperity is rapidly increasing waste volumes in emerging countries.

The rapid surge in waste volumes since 2007 is straining waste-management systems in many developing countries, with negative effects in economic, health, and ecosystem terms.

The Philippines is a case in point: it produces 2.7 million metric tons of plastic waste per year 600,000 metric tons in metro Manila alone.

As Inge Lardinois and Arnold van de Klundert wrote 20 years ago: By almost any form of evaluation, solid waste management is a growing environmental and financial problem in developing countries.

Despite significant efforts in the last decades, the majority of municipalities in the developing countries cannot manage the growing volume of waste produced in their cities.

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South Africa’s problem in managing e-waste is getting worse because of a lack of recycling infrastructure, poor legislation and ignorance, according to industry commentators.

Finally, informal e-waste recycling usually only includes the early stages of recycling – collection, crude dismantling and sorting.

Informal recyclers are vulnerable, often deal with e-waste in a hazardous way, and are open to exploitation.

It also recommended the active engagement of all stakeholders in the current drive by eWASA to establish an e-waste management system, the support of small business start-ups and informal recyclers, and support for investment in new recycling technology through incentives.

Current waste management legislation in South Africa does not require landfill owners or recyclers to keep accurate records regarding e-waste volumes.

Keith Anderson, chairman of eWASA believes that e-waste recycling rates in South Africa are improving but are not at an international standard yet due to poor education and the high cost of e-waste recycling plants.

 


source:Hauke Engelhttp://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/sustainability-and-resource-productivity/our-insights/managing-waste-in-emerging-markets