“Stop calling for SOCIAL distancing”

We should never show prejudice to anyone’s illness, in doing so would be disrespecting, degrading for something that is beyond their ability to control. This COVID-19 virus is nasty for it’s turning us to selfish and self-centered people. Everyone wants to be prepared and that we are doing so without the consideration of another.

Everyone is saying that we should have social distancing – this goes against our community dynamics and further divides our already divided country. Instead of calling it “social distancing”, rather refer to it as “physical distancing” for this would be more appropriate as all that is going on in the country and the issues we face – we need each other and not to have social interactions is an absurdity.

Serving our community

We should never show prejudice to anyone’s illness, in doing so would be disrespecting, degrading for something that is beyond their ability to control. This COVID-19 virus is nasty for it’s turning us to selfish and self-centered people. Everyone wants to be prepared and that we are doing so without the consideration of another.

There is a growing taboo on anyone sneezing, coughing or showing any common signs of illness. We know that this is impossible in cases of hay-fever or the common cold, and now we are frowning upon such natural seasons of life; believing anyone showing any signs of Corona is a threat to your “sterile” life.

We must be courteous and kind in showing love to our neighbour – therefore as a gesture of love, IVOTESA, has gone into the community of Orange Grove to provide liquid soap to the unemployed. As the country stockpiles, there are the marginalised who are isolated, cut-off, and unable to purchase or stockpile. Many a times, they would go to the shops with little in their pockets only to find the shelves empty. In their desperation, there are the opportunists using the coronavirus crisis to hike up their profits without any consideration for the poor or needy.

Soap is only a small gesture, of now a very basic necessity. We are only as clean as our weakest neighbour. Let’s strengthen everyone around us at this time.
IVOTESA is looking for any donation of soap and cleaning products for us to distribute. We are also looking for volunteers willing to serve our community.

University of KwaZulu-Natal…Get an Education!

University of KwaZulu-Natal’s (#UKZN’s) Edgewood Campus and Howards Campus. You have a great task ahead of yourselves. Do you rebuild and educate the nation beyond the theory? So to show better academia and not merely a qualification factory so that your students respect you and honour our country? Or do us a favour and please shut your doors so that your students’ behaviour is not the school of destruction imitating throughout the country.

What sort of childish, immature and reckless behaviour are our universities and government nurturing? There is no reason justifying criminal behaviour which impedes on the rest of society. Where are the authorities? Anarchies of today want to destroy the future for us all.

South Africa is no longer under any oppressive government (it may feel that way) but we are free. This wannabe freedom fighters [*BS] has to stop for there are other constructive methods of getting one’s grievances heard in a civil manner.

The country already recognises that our leaders in Parliament are not the best of example so let’s look at those who positively contributed to the South Africa we live in today. In saying that some did conduct destructive methodologies – to which we are now paying for the fruits of their actions when we see delinquents burning and destroying our country today we’re similar of our country’s history.

University of KwaZulu-Natal’s (#UKZN’s) Edgewood Campus and Howards Campus. You have a great task ahead of yourselves. Do you rebuild and educate the nation beyond the theory? So to show better academia and not merely a qualification factory so that your students respect you and honour our country? Or do us a favour and please shut your doors so that your students’ behaviour is not the school of destruction imitating throughout the country.

University of KwaZulu-Natal’s (UKZN’s) Edgewood Campus and Howards Campus, get your students under control.

Trading votes for food when it costed blood!

The right to vote – it came at the cost of blood. Fathers, mothers, children and maybe someone’s uncle. They were beaten, killed and oppressed like animals. Yet today that very vote can be purchased for a bag of groceries… Shame on those who mock our freedom… Shame on you who mock the martyrs… Shame on you!

There was a period in our country’s history that the past would be reconciled to bring healing to the open wounds and trauma caused by the injustices of Apartheid.

People were willing to move on, to begin walking together – a new government had formed and that government represented the people. As the world watched on with admiration to see a lesson demonstrated by the millions of South Africans willing to show love.

Now the reality hits and that same government which once promised a better life had only managed to achieve it for themselves. They have forgotten the townships and the hopes and dreams which the people patiently anticipated.

Alexandra Township – Johannesburg

Even so the people are trusting despite promise after promise failing, and yet year after year these representatives look more like the Hollywood glamour models showing their swag. Alas, the only swag our people can show forth is the fake goods of designer labels brought in from the Far East.

Ours are a people trusting, loving and generous to have room in their big hearts to be faithful to their “freedom fighters”. Why has anyone not told the masses that Apartheid is abolished and that they are now free? We all know that despite the chains of oppression enslaving our people are the schemes to keep them from freedom, and so the education system does what the Apartheid system did… narrowing their dreams of success.

The right to vote – it came at the cost of blood. Fathers, mothers, children and maybe someone’s uncle. They were beaten, killed and oppressed like animals. Yet today that very vote can be purchased for a bag of groceries… Shame on those who mock our freedom… Shame on you who mock the martyrs… Shame on you!

Migrants are bad for South African society and its economy?

The most important reasons behind the prevalence of xenophobia in South Africa are economic and the tendency to criminalise foreigners.

The most important reasons behind the prevalence of xenophobia in South Africa are economic and the tendency to criminalise foreigners.

Existing explanations in terms of economic crises, political transition, relative deprivation, or remnants of apartheid all contain an element of truth but are not in themselves sufficient.

Proclamations from politicians coupled with media reporting on drug syndicates, prostitution and human trafficking, all feed and in turn feed off a popular perception that migrants are bad for South African society and its economy.

It is all too easy for the media and the government to place blame on immigrants for crime, unemployment and housing problems but it is not a long-term solution and, eventually, can only be detrimental for the economy, culture, society and international image of South Africa.

The government faces a pressing need to find a way for citizens and foreigners to live peaceably together and to tackle the problems that xenophobes justify their actions by.

Xenophobia may manifest itself violently through rioting and attacks on foreigners amongst the poorer, black population, but it is an issue for all sectors of South African society and one that is becoming increasingly urgent for the government to address.

Perhaps the most important point to realise is that these misguided feelings of hatred and bitter resentment are based solely on the perception of economic harm and of immigrant involvement in criminal activities, therefore the primary focus for the government must be education and to correct these misperceptions.

 

 

 

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source:http://www.saccps.org/pdf/2-2/SAPSS%202(2)%20Solomon%20&%20Kosaka.pdfaccessed07/05/16