When evil is called good and good evil.

Let’s pray for our country.

Partisan politics are destroying our country. Each person justifying their integrity through Word and not deed. We are now flying dangerously close to oblivion without a thought for its future or it’s children…

Definitely there must be a reason or a pressure which places the interests of self before their neighbour. A reason so real that does not allow the leaders to steal bread from their subjects.

We need to pray for the ANC, DA and EEF. Let’s pray that God brings conviction to our leaders. Let’s pray that those in position of leadership and authority will surrender to the fear of God.

Chowing the Money

Please dear government – instead of torturing and progressively bleeding the country dry of its assets, and mocking the country on the international platform. Why don’t you guys just clear its bank accounts and retire to Cuba or some socialistic state where your ideologies could be lived out.

Please dear government – instead of torturing and progressively bleeding the country dry of its assets, and mocking the country on the international platform. Why don’t you guys just clear its bank accounts and retire to Cuba or some socialistic state where your ideologies could be lived out.

Check to see how it works in reality than in theory. You see, the young are waiting for your entire generation to depart with its bitterness and anger, and love to see the pain revenged for what the Whites have done.

Love, unity and peace seems to be a foreign concept and that not of the culture in keeping of Baba Madiba. You lot are like ravenous wolves, you chow each other and you chow the rest of the country’s resources.

It’s clear that intelligence has a minority stakeholdership in your list of priorities for the love of money has consumed you. So expressing our issues wouldn’t matter for the poor has nothing to offer you except the vote… maybe they too would become smarter to see your game!

A Picture from my day!

On a busy main road this morning I happened to see a common site most South Africans would, to that are the beggars at the traffic junctions. However, I must admit this was my first time witnessing such a desperate and reckless beggar on his knees on a very busy motorway junction.

On a busy main road this morning I happened to see a common site most South Africans would, to that are the beggars at the traffic junctions. However, I must admit this was my first time witnessing such a desperate and reckless beggar on his knees on a very busy motorway junction.

Many of these beggars are not South African, they have come into the country illegally by bribing officers at the border controls. Gilbert (27), a Zimbabwean told me how easy it is to come into South Africa without proper documentation. He mentioned that it usually cost R2500 to bribe the border control officers. Once they arrive in the country – many cannot find jobs and some don’t have enough to find accommodation thereby the parks have become illegal migrant havens to sleep, bathe and congregate.

Many of such individuals have no identity proof, there are no records of their existence in South Africa and thus it is the perfect condition for organised crime. Much of Johannesburg is slowly being taken over by such migrants with dilapidated, unsanitary and informal businesses on the road-side all trying to make a living.

South Africa fails to protect 363 rhinos but claims it is an improvement?

A total of 363 rhinos were poached in South Africa in the first four months of this year. That is down from 404 rhinos lost to poaching in South Africa in the same period last year. What if someone’s job depended on the safeguard of these endangered animals? Do you think the results would be the same?

A total of 363 rhinos were poached in South Africa in the first four months of this year, Minister of Environmental Affairs, Edna Molewa, said on Monday.

That is down from 404 rhinos lost to poaching in South Africa in the same period last year, according to official figures.

The Kruger National Park , one of Africa’s biggest game reserves in north-eastern South Africa, continued to bear the brunt of rhino poaching, losing 232 rhinos from January to April, said Molewa.

What if someone’s job depended on the safeguard of these endangered animals? Do you think the results would be the same?


Since 2008 poachers have killed at least 5,940 African rhinos……

Rhino poaching is currently at a crisis point. By the end of 2015, the number of African rhinos killed by poachers had increased for the sixth year in a row with at least 1,338 rhinos killed by poachers across Africa in 2015. These statistics are compiled by by International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Survival Commission’s African Rhino Specialist Group (AfRSG).

South Africa has by far the largest population of rhinos in the world and is an incredibly important country for rhino conservation. However rhino poaching levels have dramatically escalated over recent years. The below graph shows the exponential increase in poaching from 2007 – 2015.

1,175 rhinos were poached in South Africa during 2015, a slight decrease on the previous year when a record 1,215 rhinos were illegally killed. This is the first time the country has recorded a dip in poaching levels since 2007, when the rate of poaching began to escalate rapidly.

Although it is encouraging to see South Africa’s poaching levels fall slightly, poaching losses are still extremely high. 40 fewer rhinos killed in 2015 than in 2014 is statistically insignificant when you’re talking such large numbers of poaching deaths.

2015 South African rhino poaching

Above: Graph showing South African rhino poaching statistics using data published by South African Department of Environmental Affairs (2016)

Worryingly, the crisis has spread to neighbouring countries in southern Africa, with Namibia and Zimbabwe experiencing an exponential increase in poaching. During 2015, Namibia lost 80 rhinos to poaching, up from 25 in 2014 and just two in 2012. In Zimbabwe, it is reported that at least 50 rhinos were poached last year, more than double the previous year. For Africa as a whole, the total number of rhinos poached during 2015 was the highest in two decades.

Rhinos were once abundant throughout Africa and Asia with an approximated worldwide population of 500 000 in the early twentieth century. However, despite intensive conservation efforts, poaching of this iconic species is dramatically increasing, pushing the remaining rhinos closer and closer towards extinction. The Western black rhino was declared extinct by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) in 2011, with the primary cause identified as poaching. In fact, all five remaining rhinos species are listed on the IUCN Redlist of threatened species, with three out of five species classified as critically endangered.

The current poaching crisis is attributed to the growing demand for rhino horn in Asian countries, mainly Vietnam and China. Vietnam has been identified as the largest user country of rhino horn. Although rhino horn has no scientific medical benefits, consumers are using it to treat a wide range of conditions, from cancer to hangovers, and due to its high value it is now also used as a status symbol by wealthy individuals. The high price fetched for the horn has attracted the involvement of ruthless criminal syndicates who use high-tech equipment to track down and kill the rhinos.To learn more about the threats to rhino please click here.

Law enforcement plays a crucial role in deterring poachers, however there is no single answer to combat the current poaching crisis. A variety of strategies are needed to combat poaching including rigorous anti-poaching and monitoring patrols, community conservation and environmental education schemes, captive breeding, translocations and demand reduction projects in Asia. If you want to contribute to these efforts and be a part of saving the worlds remaining rhino please click here to find out more about supporting Save the Rhino International.

 

 


source:https://www.savetherhino.org/rhino_info/poaching_statistics/ picture property of brendonnaicker.org

7 Steps in Securing a Government Tender

The definition of public procurement encompasses all purchases of goods and services by public institutions in a country, and involves contracts between the government and the private sector in a variety of areas such as health services, the military, construction, etc. Reliable procurement practices transform funds into hospitals, schools and roads.

Procurement accounts for a large part of public resources and thus it is important that the tender procedures occur in an accountable, transparent and well-managed way.

Corruption in public procurement takes away benefits meant for citizens, and lowers the levels of public trust and confidence in the government. It can also be linked to service delivery protests and the erosion of honest competitive bidding.

South Africa loses about R25- to R30-billion of the annual government procurement budget to tender corruption.

The definition of public procurement encompasses all purchases of goods and services by public institutions in a country, and involves contracts between the government and the private sector in a variety of areas such as health services, the military, construction, etc. Reliable procurement practices transform funds into hospitals, schools and roads.
Corruption in public procurement takes away benefits meant for citizens, and lowers the levels of public trust and confidence in the government.

Trends in reports

According to Corruption Watch data, the trends that emerge from submitted reports indicate that:

  • Bribery is rampant in tender processes;
  • Relevant committees indicate a preference for a certain supplier;
  • Tenders are not being advertised or circulated;
  • Dates are altered to accommodate certain suppliers;
  • Appointment of suppliers whose scores do not reflect that they are the best applicants.

The Public Protector has become an increasingly important public watchdog organisation in South Africa, particularly following the judgment by the Constitutional Court on 31 March 2016 on the powers of the Public Protector.

Baqwa has been praised for his contribution to establishing the Office of the Public Protector and raising awareness of the institution, its mandate and services.

Gary Pienaar, a chief investigator in the OPP national office from 1997 to 2002 and in the Western Cape provincial office from 2000 to 2008, notes that Baqwa significantly expanded the investigative skills capacity of staff and initiated an outreach programme that sent investigators into various communities to raise awareness about the OPP and its functions.

He has also been credited for his contribution to Chapter M of the Public Service Regulations, which serves as an administrative guide to ethical and efficient conduct in the public service, as well as with establishing positive relationships with other Chapter 9 institutions and the International Ombudsman Institute.

The then minister of health, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, was accused of misusing public funds and misleading Parliament, and the Public Protector was called on to investigate.

 

 

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source:http://www.corruptionwatch.org.za/understanding-tender-corruption-part-one/accessed15/04/16(2)Think Tenders. Freelance Bid Writing Service and Tender Writer Birmingham(3)http://www.corruptionwatch.org.za/sas-public-protectors-legacies-part-one/accessed15/04/16

Port Shepstone is for Sale!

I’ve just returned for a brief visit recently and to witness how my beloved Port Shepstone now lies in ruins – ethically and socially. She is being raped and abused by her leadership. Those entrusted to care for savage beaches, beautiful landscapes and her treasures have gone mad.

So many residents complain about their Councillors, the bribery, corruption by brokering deals which are for self-interest rather than the greater good of the community. I’m told that much of the leadership is so blinded for self-gain that they have not actually stopped for a moment to see how a vibrant pretty boutique town is turning into a cheap derelict place.

Port Shepstone is on the Southeast coast of South Africa. It is approximately sixty-minutes from Durban by car — boasting some of the most spectacular beaches and varieties of vegetation and of multi-cultural communities as you drive along the coast. This town is special to me for a number of reasons – it’s where I used to take my boat into the Umzimkulu River, despite not knowing how to swim, collecting as many sardines my small hand could grasp as thousands wash up onto our shores every year; it’s where I sat in the bushes munching sugarcane or picking lychee, mangoes and avocados.
Port Shepstone is my hometown and the smell of the humid salty air and familiar horizon of the ocean are likening to a warm blanket comforting me which says, “You are home!”. I remember when Seychelles (the name of a company) which used to sell ice-cream at the Port Shepstone beach and how safe the beach were to just park and watch the waves crush as we shared a meal, or enjoying the ride of a vintage locomotive called the Banana Express.
I’ve just returned for a brief visit recently and to witness how my beloved Port Shepstone now lies in ruins – ethically and socially. She is being raped and abused by her leadership. Those entrusted to care for savage beaches, beautiful landscapes and her treasures have gone mad.
So many residents complain about their Councillors, the bribery, corruption by brokering deals which are for self-interest rather than the greater good of the community. I’m told that much of the leadership is so blinded for self-gain that they have not actually stopped for a moment to see how a vibrant pretty boutique town is turning into a cheap derelict place.
Many can disagree all they want with me, but the truth of the situation is seen by its visitors who have been to my lovely town in the years gone by as ‘the fortune seekers and gold diggers’ whom sworn an oath to protect and serve our town. The astounding nature of these abuses are known by most people in the town, at present they can parade in their new cars and purchase properties in the names of immediate families. Every time our representatives (government officials) participate in corruption and abuse their power, someone is unemployed, someone’s family starves and someone turns to crime. May the blood of the victims be upon our corrupt officials as they turn a blind eye.
I’m hoping that our provincial government would investigate all local government officials, their families and immediate families to understand how is that our local politicians are doing so well financially and what are of those tenders? In addition, when an investigation is underway please be sure that the investigating officer too is not easily purchased – just as the way our town is being sold-off!

What does it say when Voters exchange Votes for food bribes?

Given the short-sightedness of these voters and the mockery to such whom had sacrificed their lives so that every South African can choose a candidate for the betterment of the country not their stomachs. Despite the distastefulness of this method in seducing voters, the authorities seem to have turned a blind-eye to this open bribery. Most councillors, who are voted in, are confronted on day one of the job displaying a lack of communication skills and have a low level of education and etiquette.

voteI’m informed that most communities (predominately the literate) are easily swayed by the candidate whose “bribe-gift” is worth the most. These gifts consist of Maize meal, beans, cooking oil (food items, etc.).

Given the short-sightedness of such voters and the mockery to those whom had sacrificed their lives so that every South African can choose a candidate for the betterment of the country not their stomachs. Despite the distastefulness of this method in salavating voters, the authorities seem to have turned a blind-eye to this open bribery. I’m told that most councillors, who are voted in, are confronted on day one of the job displaying a lack of communication skills and have a low level of education and etiquette.

foodOne of the common reasons for selecting a candidate is their rhetoric and charisma, many councillors still appear to give liberation speeches as if it South Africa was still oppressed by apartheid. Hate speech is a common mean in rallying the masses, promising them homes, jobs, and the possessions of the non-blacks.

Many vote for the ANC not because of Jacob Zuma or others but because they appreciate the party which sacrificed so much to bring them to freedom. The nation’s father, Madiba is also the reason many vote ANC but when the people begin to realise that its own government is robbing them. This would be considered to be betrayal. South Africa is on a time bomb and the people of South Africa are a passionate, patriotic people who I believe will soon revolt against the abuses Zuma’s government and restore the ANC to the ideologies of the true revolutionaries gone-by!

Amandla Awethu!

Politics in South Africa today is devoid of political content.

democracyDriving from the international airport, I was struck by the sheer wretchedness of Cape Flats: the series of black townships, comprising mostly shacks with corrugated steel roofs, that stretch from the highway almost to the horizon. Few people — tourists or locals — want to talk about the Cape Flats. But there is no better starting point for a discussion of the state of contemporary South Africa.

I was shocked by the degree to which the predominant emotions, 21 years after the end of apartheid, are not of hope and expectation, but of fear and despair.

“It’s not rosy,” a leader of the United Front opposition political movement in the eastern Cape city of East London told me, “but it’s not yet totally bleak.” That was about the most optimistic view I heard.

For much of the black population, fear and despair arise out of the sense that while South Africa became a democratic nation after apartheid, in many ways very little has changed.

Khayelitsha, the largest township in the Cape Flats, was established in 1983 by the apartheid government to house about 200,000 black workers. According to the 2011 census, almost double that number now live there. More than half live in “informal housing” — shacks, in other words.

IMG_1707Almost four in 10 people are unemployed. Barely one-third have piped water in their dwellings; a quarter have no flush toilets; about one in five has no access to electricity. Many of these figures are worse than they were under apartheid; others are little changed.

Apartheid had an immensely dehumanizing impact. But it also caused communities to forge powerful social bonds and channel anger into resistance and liberation movements.

The destructive effect of contemporary policies has led not to the creation of stronger bonds, but to the unraveling of the fabric of society. The social anthropologist Leslie J. Bank describes it as a form of “fractured urbanism,” in which traditional social organizations have collapsed and forms of social control have dissolved, creating a political and social vacuum.

Unlike under apartheid, there is no obvious target for people’s rage. There are protests, almost daily, against housing conditions, police brutality and political corruption. There is considerable anger against the ruling African National Congress, in both national and local governments. Yet the relationship of people, even of critics, to the A.N.C. is complex. It remains, for most, the party that brought about liberation, and so retains considerable moral legitimacy.

The confusion about whom to blame for conditions that seem little improved from the days of apartheid has often led people to turn on one other. The explosion of xenophobic violence, directed against migrant workers from other African nations, that swept through South Africa in 2008, and again this year, is one expression of this. So is the growing conflict between apartheid-defined categories of people, like “blacks” and “coloreds.”

New conflicts have also emerged, like the one between longtime residents of Cape Town’s townships (who call themselves “borners” — people born in the townships) and immigrants from elsewhere in South Africa. Such divisions have been exacerbated, even exploited, by sections of the A.N.C. As the failure to transform the lives of the poor has eroded support for the party, many A.N.C. politicians have turned to the politics of ethnicity and identity to strengthen their base.

It is a development that has long been evident, but that has really gathered strength under the leadership of South Africa’s current president, Jacob G. Zuma. Mr. Zuma has unashamedly exploited his Zulu identity — “100% Zulu Boy” read the slogan on supporters’ T-shirts before the 2009 general election. And to shore up his support, he has promoted supposedly traditional African values, enhancing, for example, the powers of unelected tribal chiefs.

Last year, his government attempted to pass the Traditional Courts Bill that would have created a separate legal system for millions of people living in the former Bantustans, allowing local chiefs to act as judges, prosecutors and mediators, with no legal representation and no right of appeal.

“Let us solve African problems the African way, not the white man’s way,” Mr. Zuma proclaimed in defense of the law.

“It’s shocking how the language of apartheid now comes out of black mouths,” one former activist said to me.

The situation has been made worse by the issue that dominates South African politics today: corruption. Almost daily, there is a new scandal. Accusations reach up to the highest state office — Mr. Zuma himself has been embroiled in a long-running scandal — and threaten to besmirch the integrity of institutions like the National Prosecuting Authority.

Corruption expresses the way that state patronage has come to define politics. Politics in South Africa today “is devoid of political content,” in the words of a former A.N.C. activist, Raymond Suttner. Instead, “it relates to who is rising or falling, as part of ongoing efforts to secure positions of power and authority.” Using corrupt resources to win favours from different social groups and factions has helped entrench a dangerous cronyism in national politics.

While sections of the political elite have tried to manipulate the politics of ethnicity to bypass democracy, many at the grass-roots level have opposed these moves. Popular opposition killed the Traditional Courts Bill. Last month, a community in the Eastern Cape won a court battle to elect its own leaders, rather than have them imposed. It cannot be right, the court agreed, that the people of the Transkei region “enjoyed greater democratic rights” under apartheid “than they do under a democratically elected government.”

It is a telling comment on the state of contemporary South Africa that the government can be chastised for being less democratic than it was under apartheid. If the future of South Africa is not to be totally bleak, it is in such struggles for democracy against the corrupt elite that hope must lie.

Written by Kenan Malik, he is the author, most recently, of “The Quest for a Moral Compass: A Global History of Ethics” and a contributing opinion writer.

Jurassic Politicians should be put in the Apartheid Museum!

…many of the “Jurassic Politicians” are yet fighting against injustice and awaiting retribution even twenty years gone by, they seem to have been short-changed to the towering giants of the ruling “fat cats”. As they watch in envy, their comrades sitting on the gravy train whilst they watch and applaud shouting, “Amandla Iwetto” on the side-lines.

Many of the younger generation such as myself are witnessing the extinction of a breed of Politicians to which I will now refer to as the “Jurassic Politicians”. Bless them – they had suffered, been imprisoned and deduced to scorn under the Apartheid regime to which many of them could not all fit into parliament.sa

Now sadly many of them are yet fighting against injustice and awaiting retribution even twenty years gone by, they seem to have been short-changed to the towering giants of the ruling “fat cats”. As they watch in envy, their comrades sitting on the gravy train whilst they watch and applaud shouting, “Amandla Iwetto” on the side-lines.

It is a sad occurrence as many who believe that the reason for their “still” impoverished state is due to their white counterpart, or if not “whites” – just anyone who is better off than themselves. So envy and jealousy are now “clouded” with terms such as justice, level playing field and equality.

My generation who is open-minded and have been prepared to embrace a multi-cultural and diverse world sees no colour. We see education as the key to being anything you want to be and do, as opportunities are ample.

However, the Jurassic Politicians attempt to clip away the wings of this generation and therefore results in merit and accolades are not the determining factors of success but corruption and colour of one’s skin, as they themselves lack substance.

Many of the Jurassic Politicians have not finished school, or have kept a proper job yet they have been entrusted with vast amounts of public funds and responsibilities beyond their experiences or skills. I am of the younger generation and I am sure there are many with similar views who say:

  1. We don’t want further divisions against skin colour despite what you may call it BEE or “WEE” it’s not what we want!
  2. We want peace and stability of the economy and welfare. We don’t care about the offences of the past as they are forgiven.
  3. We don’t want to take revenge on crimes committed from a previous era for their descendants to pay now. This is cruel and evil.
  4. We want these “Jurassic Politicians” to grow up and wake up as times have changed!