A vision of a “rainbow nation” characterised by shared prosperity for all

South Africa has travelled a remarkable road in the two decades since its transition to democracy. There are key opportunities that can reignite South Africa’s progress. South Africa can draw on its skilled labour to grow into a globally competitive manufacturing hub focussed on high-value added categories such as automotive, industrial machinery and equipment, and chemicals.

South Africa has travelled a remarkable road in the two decades since its transition to democracy.  There are key opportunities that can reignite South Africa’s progress. South Africa can draw on its skilled labour to grow into a globally competitive manufacturing hub focussed on high-value added categories such as automotiveindustrial machinery and equipmentand chemicals.

South Africa is investing heavily in infrastructurebut big gaps remain in electricitywaterand sanitation.

South Africa’s electricity shortage has constrained growthand despite new capacityanother shortfall is projected between 2025 and 2030.

With the necessary regulatory certaintyit has been estimate that South Africa could install up to 20GW of gas-fired power plants to diversify base-load capacity by 2030.

South Africa has highly developed service industriesyet it currently captures only 2% of the rest of sub-Saharan Africa’s market for service importswhich is worth nearly half a trillion rand.

With consumption rising in markets throughout sub– Saharan Africa and AsiaSouth Africa could triple its agricultural exports by 2030.

This could be a key driver of rural growthbenefiting the nearly one in ten South Africans who depend on subsistence or smallholder farming.

Successfully delivering on these priorities will move South Africa closer to realising its long-held vision of a “Rainbow nation” characterised by shared prosperity for all.

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source:http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/middle-east-and-africa/south-africas-bold-priorities-for-inclusive-growth-Richard Hobbs accessed05/03/16

Corporate and Societal Interests must Converge

Over the past several decades, one of the great discussions within capitalism has centered on defining exactly what a business is and what its obligations are to society at large and to the many stakeholders participating in business systems, including customers, shareholders, employees, suppliers, and communities, to name a few.

Over the past several decades, one of the great discussions within capitalism has centered on defining exactly what a business is and what its obligations are to society at large and to the many stakeholders participating in business systems, including customers, shareholders, employees, suppliers, and communities, to name a few.

Even when faced with reputational challenges, companies sometimes launch social initiatives as side projects only tenuously linked to the core business, rather than strengthening and articulating the ways in which the core business adds value to society.

While it is important to operate the core business in a way that delivers value for society and the business, a healthy, high-performing company can and must go further.

To achieve the magnitude of change the United Nations, World Wildlife Fund, CDP and others have called for in food, such as a reduction in water usage, a 3 percent annual decrease in private-sector greenhouse-gas emissions, and a 15 percent increase in yield in the next ten years, leaders of the food system must take concerted, coordinated action.

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source:http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/strategy/business_and_society_in_the_coming_decadesbyKathleen McLaughlin