Is Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) Working?

BEE or Black Economic Empowerment is a tool employed by the South African government supposedly to address the racial injustices of the past and to also redress the economic imbalances created by South Africas past apartheid system.

The other organisations which participated in this alliance included the allies of the ANC, the South African Indian Congress, the South African Congress of Democrats and the Coloured Peoples Congress.

Nelson Mandela’s brand of Black economic empowerment included a complete overhaul of the national economy, where the state decisively intervenes to change the very structures of the economy.

History has it that it was not until 1992 at that conference, Davos at the World Economic Forum when Nelson Mandela finally and completely dropped his pursuit for Black economic empowerment through nationalisation.

Nelson Mandela and the ANC basically told these business people to continue in their ownership of South Africa’s economy and to give to black people whatever crumbs that fall off from their tables.

The reality is that without BEE there would not have been the same level of black participation in the economy, says Martin Kingston of Rothschild, which advises companies on BEE. Pitifully few black South Africans have grown rich by creating entirely new businesses, perhaps because it seems so much easier to make money by acquiring stakes in existing firms.

The collapse in stock prices in 2008 left many would-be tycoons with assets that were worth less than the loans taken out to buy them.

The binding constraint on greater black participation in the economy is education, says Lucy Holborn from the South African Institute of Race Relations, a think-tank that has called for BEE to be scrapped.

The proportion of professionals who are black is 36%, fairly close to the share of degrees held by blacks, which is around 40%.

 

source:http://www.news24.com/MyNews24/BEE-South-Africas-great-injustice-20131106.(2)http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21576655-black-economic-empowerment-has-not-worked-well-nor-will-it-end-soon-fools-gold.

The relationship between big business and the government in South Africa

In the years ahead, we should see business stepping up with innovative solutions rather than waiting for government to impose policies such as black economic empowerment or, worse still, being caught out in scandals of collusion, as have been seen in the construction sector and even the bread industry.

South African companies need to acknowledge their role in apartheid and apply their resources to the challenges of today.

Had they taken that opportunity to reflect on their role in a fundamentally unfair system and, coming out of that process, to institutionalise the necessary changes, they would be playing a much more meaningful role in the transformation of South Africa today.

The relationship between big business and the government would also be in a far healthier state than it is, 21 years after we achieved democracy.

For example, when US presidents visit another country, they never fail to take with them a representative from a big American company, such as GE or Boeing.

Even though the US government isn’t a shareholder in those businesses, the president backs them from a distance when he makes a state visit.

In the years ahead, we should see business stepping up with innovative solutions rather than waiting for government to impose policies such as black economic empowerment or, worse still, being caught out in scandals of collusion, as have been seen in the construction sector and even the bread industry.

 

 

 

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source: Reimagining South Africa, edited by McKinsey & Company.http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/middle-east-and-africa/its-time-for-south-african-business-to-step-upaccessed19/04/16

Dear Rt Hon “Freedom” Fighter, Politician, Civil Servant, and Gravy-Train Passenger.

Take for example my childhood town in Port Shepstone, I have fond memories of a steam engine train called the “Banana Express”. The train used to take tourists along the beautiful south coast boasting the manicured gardens, well kept public pools and lovely little shops. However once the “freedom” fighters got into power they have turned this garden of a site liken to a dump -yard and constant complaining of the abuses of the “whites’ yet they are willing to watch their town deteriorate so long as their household income is not affected by the plague they are causing.

Dear Rt Hon “Freedom” Fighter, Politician, Minister of Parliament, Civil Servant, and Gravy-Train Passenger,

image1
If you look at the wall you could see the text, “Banana Express”

Why is corruption and embezzlement the way of life for most African government leaders and to whom you are emulating? It seems that there is no shame in being called the dark continent where poverty, wars, corruption, AIDS/HIV, illiteracy and starvation are rampant. Ironically Africa is rich with deposits of oil, gold, diamonds and yet even after centuries of being freed from the dominion of the colonist exploiters, Africa has raised some of its own to further ravage itself. Maybe this is not a colour issue like some make it out to believe, for whether it be black or white the results are the same for the exception that the white-men were not as heartless as many “freedom” fighters believe for they at least built schools, hospitals and infrastructure which is yet evident and in some cases the only evidence of development within South Africa today.

Take for example my childhood town in Port Shepstone, I have fond memories of a steam engine train called the “Banana Express”. The train used to take tourists along the beautiful south coast boasting the manicured gardens, well kept public pools and lovely little shops. However once the “freedom” fighters got into power they have turned this garden of a site liken to a dump -yard and constant complaining of the abuses of the “whites’ yet they are willing to watch their town deteriorate so long as their household income is not affected by the plague they are causing.

Tacky sign board in Port Shepstone advertising Coke
Tacky sign board to Port Shepstone advertising Coke

Memories of my childhood are being eroded whilst a younger generation is growing up in what they are told “has been left by apartheid”. These “freedom” fighters have no longer a cause or struggles, so they are becoming skilled speech makers. Having listened to some of their reasons for the mess they have caused is really quite entertaining. I don’t believe that they listen to themselves and hear the contradictions of the changes to their stories.

image4We watch and see as they dismantle our country, as they strip it apart and sell it off to foreigners. Yet, the delusion is incredible that these very people will tell you the benefits that they have contributed and how rosy life is! Yet much of the majority are talking about you, your new car, your new houses and you luxury holidays. Enjoy it my dear Civil Servants… the masses are coming for you.

Politics in South Africa today is devoid of political content.

democracyDriving from the international airport, I was struck by the sheer wretchedness of Cape Flats: the series of black townships, comprising mostly shacks with corrugated steel roofs, that stretch from the highway almost to the horizon. Few people — tourists or locals — want to talk about the Cape Flats. But there is no better starting point for a discussion of the state of contemporary South Africa.

I was shocked by the degree to which the predominant emotions, 21 years after the end of apartheid, are not of hope and expectation, but of fear and despair.

“It’s not rosy,” a leader of the United Front opposition political movement in the eastern Cape city of East London told me, “but it’s not yet totally bleak.” That was about the most optimistic view I heard.

For much of the black population, fear and despair arise out of the sense that while South Africa became a democratic nation after apartheid, in many ways very little has changed.

Khayelitsha, the largest township in the Cape Flats, was established in 1983 by the apartheid government to house about 200,000 black workers. According to the 2011 census, almost double that number now live there. More than half live in “informal housing” — shacks, in other words.

IMG_1707Almost four in 10 people are unemployed. Barely one-third have piped water in their dwellings; a quarter have no flush toilets; about one in five has no access to electricity. Many of these figures are worse than they were under apartheid; others are little changed.

Apartheid had an immensely dehumanizing impact. But it also caused communities to forge powerful social bonds and channel anger into resistance and liberation movements.

The destructive effect of contemporary policies has led not to the creation of stronger bonds, but to the unraveling of the fabric of society. The social anthropologist Leslie J. Bank describes it as a form of “fractured urbanism,” in which traditional social organizations have collapsed and forms of social control have dissolved, creating a political and social vacuum.

Unlike under apartheid, there is no obvious target for people’s rage. There are protests, almost daily, against housing conditions, police brutality and political corruption. There is considerable anger against the ruling African National Congress, in both national and local governments. Yet the relationship of people, even of critics, to the A.N.C. is complex. It remains, for most, the party that brought about liberation, and so retains considerable moral legitimacy.

The confusion about whom to blame for conditions that seem little improved from the days of apartheid has often led people to turn on one other. The explosion of xenophobic violence, directed against migrant workers from other African nations, that swept through South Africa in 2008, and again this year, is one expression of this. So is the growing conflict between apartheid-defined categories of people, like “blacks” and “coloreds.”

New conflicts have also emerged, like the one between longtime residents of Cape Town’s townships (who call themselves “borners” — people born in the townships) and immigrants from elsewhere in South Africa. Such divisions have been exacerbated, even exploited, by sections of the A.N.C. As the failure to transform the lives of the poor has eroded support for the party, many A.N.C. politicians have turned to the politics of ethnicity and identity to strengthen their base.

It is a development that has long been evident, but that has really gathered strength under the leadership of South Africa’s current president, Jacob G. Zuma. Mr. Zuma has unashamedly exploited his Zulu identity — “100% Zulu Boy” read the slogan on supporters’ T-shirts before the 2009 general election. And to shore up his support, he has promoted supposedly traditional African values, enhancing, for example, the powers of unelected tribal chiefs.

Last year, his government attempted to pass the Traditional Courts Bill that would have created a separate legal system for millions of people living in the former Bantustans, allowing local chiefs to act as judges, prosecutors and mediators, with no legal representation and no right of appeal.

“Let us solve African problems the African way, not the white man’s way,” Mr. Zuma proclaimed in defense of the law.

“It’s shocking how the language of apartheid now comes out of black mouths,” one former activist said to me.

The situation has been made worse by the issue that dominates South African politics today: corruption. Almost daily, there is a new scandal. Accusations reach up to the highest state office — Mr. Zuma himself has been embroiled in a long-running scandal — and threaten to besmirch the integrity of institutions like the National Prosecuting Authority.

Corruption expresses the way that state patronage has come to define politics. Politics in South Africa today “is devoid of political content,” in the words of a former A.N.C. activist, Raymond Suttner. Instead, “it relates to who is rising or falling, as part of ongoing efforts to secure positions of power and authority.” Using corrupt resources to win favours from different social groups and factions has helped entrench a dangerous cronyism in national politics.

While sections of the political elite have tried to manipulate the politics of ethnicity to bypass democracy, many at the grass-roots level have opposed these moves. Popular opposition killed the Traditional Courts Bill. Last month, a community in the Eastern Cape won a court battle to elect its own leaders, rather than have them imposed. It cannot be right, the court agreed, that the people of the Transkei region “enjoyed greater democratic rights” under apartheid “than they do under a democratically elected government.”

It is a telling comment on the state of contemporary South Africa that the government can be chastised for being less democratic than it was under apartheid. If the future of South Africa is not to be totally bleak, it is in such struggles for democracy against the corrupt elite that hope must lie.

Written by Kenan Malik, he is the author, most recently, of “The Quest for a Moral Compass: A Global History of Ethics” and a contributing opinion writer.

Jurassic Politicians should be put in the Apartheid Museum!

…many of the “Jurassic Politicians” are yet fighting against injustice and awaiting retribution even twenty years gone by, they seem to have been short-changed to the towering giants of the ruling “fat cats”. As they watch in envy, their comrades sitting on the gravy train whilst they watch and applaud shouting, “Amandla Iwetto” on the side-lines.

Many of the younger generation such as myself are witnessing the extinction of a breed of Politicians to which I will now refer to as the “Jurassic Politicians”. Bless them – they had suffered, been imprisoned and deduced to scorn under the Apartheid regime to which many of them could not all fit into parliament.sa

Now sadly many of them are yet fighting against injustice and awaiting retribution even twenty years gone by, they seem to have been short-changed to the towering giants of the ruling “fat cats”. As they watch in envy, their comrades sitting on the gravy train whilst they watch and applaud shouting, “Amandla Iwetto” on the side-lines.

It is a sad occurrence as many who believe that the reason for their “still” impoverished state is due to their white counterpart, or if not “whites” – just anyone who is better off than themselves. So envy and jealousy are now “clouded” with terms such as justice, level playing field and equality.

My generation who is open-minded and have been prepared to embrace a multi-cultural and diverse world sees no colour. We see education as the key to being anything you want to be and do, as opportunities are ample.

However, the Jurassic Politicians attempt to clip away the wings of this generation and therefore results in merit and accolades are not the determining factors of success but corruption and colour of one’s skin, as they themselves lack substance.

Many of the Jurassic Politicians have not finished school, or have kept a proper job yet they have been entrusted with vast amounts of public funds and responsibilities beyond their experiences or skills. I am of the younger generation and I am sure there are many with similar views who say:

  1. We don’t want further divisions against skin colour despite what you may call it BEE or “WEE” it’s not what we want!
  2. We want peace and stability of the economy and welfare. We don’t care about the offences of the past as they are forgiven.
  3. We don’t want to take revenge on crimes committed from a previous era for their descendants to pay now. This is cruel and evil.
  4. We want these “Jurassic Politicians” to grow up and wake up as times have changed!

South Africa is going back to its Apartheid Days

In this blog I would like to express my sincerely disgust to the comments of Mzwanele Jimmy Manyi, the President of Progressive Professionals Forum. He recently commented that Affirmative Action policies should be revised to exclude White women, Indian men and women, as they are already empowered. He says both coloured and black women need to be prioritised… Prioritised?

In this blog I would like to express my sincere disgust to the comments of Mzwanele Jimmy Manyi, the President of Progressive Professionals Forum. He recently commented that Affirmative Action policies should be revised to exclude White women, Indian men and women, as they are already empowered. He says both coloured and black women need to be prioritised… Prioritised?

grow up
Jimmy, is further dividing our country!

Firstly, he speaks as if he speaks for the entire South African continent. This Jimmy has no clue as to what my generation thinks of such Jurassic mentality. My generation are intermarrying and engaging in integration with other cultures which are clearly not represented with our racist government.

They are so preoccupied with the colour of skin that they miss truly representing the people. Jimmy says government should be stricter in enforcing the Economic Empowerment codes. He is calling for un-designation of White women and Indians as a whole, to say ‘let them be out of the definition so that the focus can be on the Africans and the Coloureds’.

People like Jimmy need a reality check as he fails to realize that placing people in positions of authority requires merit and not race. Invest in the Education sector by providing “black” children better advantages should be some of the discussions.

People with narrow mindedness, bigoted and racists speech should be punished and discipline should be implemented. Jimmy, who is the President of Progressive Professionals Forum – and clearly he got his job for being black because he shows no professionalism nor respect for those who call themselves, “South African” and not as Jimmy indicates, “blacks, whites, coloureds, and Indians”.

Jimmy needs educating and should be reprimanded for coming out public with stupid ideologies!

Worth Knowing that the Government is not above the Law!

The real importance of the rule of law today lies in the basic idea underlying all three points (but especially the first) that the state should use its power according to agreed rules, and not arbitrarily.

The three elements for the Rule of Law.

  • First, that there should be no sanction without breach, meaning that nobody should be punished by the state unless they had broken a law.
  • Secondly, that one law should govern everyone, including both ordinary citizens and state officials.
  • Thirdly, that the rights of the individual were not secured by a written constitution, but by the decisions of judges in ordinary law.

The real importance of the rule of law today lies in the basic idea underlying all three points (but especially the first) that the state should use its power according to agreed rules, and not arbitrarily.

Don’t Incite Hatred to our Youth on this Youth Day!

I have recently come to realise that this notion is true and that some parents, teachers, political influencers and leaders in our communities are irresponsible by teaching our youths to hate and continue the struggle.

EFF and Zuma’s Cabinet are contributors to this ideology and a need to grow-up. The EFF are wearing red overalls and berets yet driving the latest German engineering (Grow up!). It is not anyone’s time, it is our country and it’s our time to act responsibly. Stop those in authority preaching their political prejudices by brainwashing our youths!

It’s clear that the wounds of apartheid are still raw in some of our people. Some can’t let go of the pains and anger, which have cost them great sacrifices so that this new South Africa can be formed – as one nation despite colour. However, the novelty of South Africa’s newness is slowly wearing-out and true emotions of hurt are yet again beginning to fester. The colours black and white are becoming more visible due to some of the unfair Policies Mr Zuma’s cabinet imposing on our nation to distinguish colour.

auMany of the young people who have not experienced injustice have taken it upon their stride to seek retribution. There is anger and hatred towards the oppressors of the past. Zuma’s administration has demonstrated that Madiba’s and Tutu’s philosophy of forgiveness and reconciliation showed weakness as opposed to the dominating of South Africa – so that the Whites, Indians, Asians and Coloureds all know that South Africa is not their land.

Being African is a current trend and we all want to show that we are – but the term, “African” can be ambiguous. It has subtly the connotation of the exclusivity towards the “native descendants of the Bantu”.

I have recently come to realise that this notion is true and that some parents, teachers, political influencers and leaders in our communities are irresponsible by teaching our youths to hate and continue the struggle.

EFF and Zuma’s Cabinet are contributors to this ideology and a need to grow-up. The EFF are wearing red overalls and berets yet driving the latest German engineering (Grow up!). It is not anyone’s time, it is our country and it’s our time to act responsibly. Stop those in authority preaching their political prejudices by brainwashing our youths!

Rule of Law Not Respected in South Africa

More than 50 million people throughout the world have been forced to flee their homes. There are more than 13 million refugees worldwide. The United Kingdom currently has 149,799 refugees, which is calculated to 0.24% of the total population.

Many, including myself have made the United Kingdom home. Despite cultural, race and creed – I am a British Citizen. Born and bred in South Africa but I’m still British and to those born within the United Kingdom has to also acknowledge that I’m British and a subject of the Queen. However this is not so in South Africa for I’m within a pecking order as a secondary citizen because being Black matters – it’s called, “Black Economic Empowerment”.

When an asylum seeker is granted status to remain and later is issued with a passport of citizenship. One is able to see this Great Britain welcome its subjects as British. Now, whether the locals like it or not, the Rule of Law dictates the attitude to which all citizens are to respect and tolerate.

We have seen in recent months of the Xenophobic attacks in South Africa as they burnt fellow Africans for being foreigners. If the Leaders of the country who rob, plunder its resources and make a mockery of its legal system – how do the authorities expect the citizens to conduct themselves?

Despite the United Kingdom’s failures and faults – I feel safe and protected (not by the government, the police nor securities) for it is the Rule of Law/ and clearly delineated within the Magna Carta which instructs that even the King is not higher than the Laws of the United Kingdom.

What is the Rule of Law?

The rule of law is the legal principle that law should govern a nation, as opposed to being governed by arbitrary decisions of individual government officials.

Racists are a dying breed soon to be displayed at the Rainbow Circus

Yet the leaders have time to continue writing absurd policies…just maybe South Africa should rename Parliament, “The Rainbow Circus,” the show is entertaining but the crowds are getting bored with your simple magic tricks. We all want to see you make the Country disappear!

It’s tough being a racist in the 21st Century and will be even more difficult as we progress to a secular progressive world. Gone are the days where racists’ names and identities of people groups are marginalised and insults where for public entertainment.

As I look at my country of birth, South Africa. I can’t help but to sympathise with the narrow “traditional bigoted” policy makers. Policies that direct a country’s economic growth based upon race. I believe many Black, Indian and even the South African Coloured are as or even more racist than the White oppressors.

The irony in all this is that the educated profession, born within the last forty years are inter-marrying. It will be a joke as these policies become obsolete as White marries Black and Black marries Indians, etc. What good would Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) Policy serve? eef

I will tell you… we will use your (BEE) for growing even more wealth. As our kids will be all registered “Black” with natives names. This dying breed of politicians is the Jurassic Age; it is only a matter of time until their era is entirely wiped out.

Let me tell you of the “man of the future” they will be of a mixed race. saNow whether this sits well with our fascists in society today it’s tough – as those who are living in the real world are enjoying the diversity.

…go ahead make a law that gives percentages based upon your “blackness or whiteness” to claiming a level playing field –  whilst the White farmers are being butchered, the traditional rural tribesman is yet without basic services and an entire country has a third-world infrastructure built by the “White-man”.

Yet the leaders have time to continue writing absurd policies…just maybe South Africa should rename Parliament, “The Rainbow Circus,” the show is entertaining but the crowds are getting bored with your simple magic tricks.

We all want to see you making yourselves disappear …and not our Country!