Here are six ways Mandela changed his country:

The difference between a selfless leader – in comparison to a selfish leader?

Forsaking bloodshed

The renunciation of violence was one of the defining moments of the political process, and earned Mandela and de Klerk the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize.

Forging a political path

The transition formally turned South Africa into a democracy, bringing in one of the world’s most progressive constitutions and allowing blacks not only into polling booths, but also into the corridors of power.

In doing so, South Africa also lost its global pariah status. Apartheid had been punished by sanctions including a trade embargo and a ban on direct flights to dozens of countries, like the United States.

A global player

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become “a rainbow nation” that would never again be seen as “the skunk of the world.”

He said: “We enter into a covenant that we shall build a society in which all South Africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts, assured of their inalienable right to human dignity – a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.”

Peace and forgiveness

Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions. Key to this was his 1995 establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission that investigated historic human rights violations and gave vent to grievances.

A cultural power

That same year, South Africa hosted the Rugby World Cup – the first event of its kind to be held there since the end of the apartheid-era sporting boycott. Along with cricket, rugby was a game played and enjoyed almost exclusively by whites, making the event tough for Mandela’s fledgling democratic government to “sell” to a wider population.

Despite resistance on both sides, Mandela swung the rainbow nation behind both the team – the Springboks – and the tournament, which South Africa won. That achievement, documented in the 2009 film “Invictus” starring Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon, illustrated the extent of South Africa’s rehabilitation and also set the country back on the path of sporting success.

A generous soul

Mandela’s other key legacy is his extensive charitable work, including the creation of the Nelson Mandela Foundation, the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and 46664 – the HIV-AIDS initiative named after his prison number. In 2009, the United Nations declared that July 18, Mandela’s birthday, would be a worldwide day of community service known as Nelson Mandela International Day.

 

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Source:http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/7-ways-nelson-mandela-changed-south-africa-f2D11702722accessed 10/03/15

South Africa is in the grips of its most serious economic and political crisis.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

The African National Congress, the liberation party –  ruling South Africa since 1994 – when the country elected its first post-apartheid government under the great Nelson Mandela. Almost two decades have passed since the end of legalised racial segregation in South Africa, yet the abolition of apartheid remains the biggest legacy of Nelson Mandela. The 1993 assassination of ANC figurehead Chris Hani by right-wing white extremists heightened fears that the country was destined for a racial blood bath, but Mandela issued an appeal:

Now is the time for all South Africans to stand together against those who, from any quarter, wish to destroy what Chris Hani gave his life for the freedom of all of us.

In his inauguration speech in 1994, Mandela heralded the country’s re-entry onto the world stage, saying it should become a rainbow nation that would never again be seen as the skunk of the world. Mandela’s biggest influence on the new South Africa was his personal determination that anger over the crimes of the past, including his 27 years as a political prisoner, should not motivate future laws and actions.

Yet President Jacob Zuma’s government have taken an authoritarian and corrupt turn- at the very moment the country needs bold and honest leadership. Weak governance is preventing it from making critical policy choices and public investments to improve social welfare and realise Mandela’s dream of a multiracial “Rainbow nation.” It is also undercutting South Africa’s capacity to lead both in Africa and on the global stage.

 

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source:http://allafrica.com/view/group/main/main/id/00040383.htmlaccessed10/03/16-2.http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/7-ways-nelson-mandela-changed-south-africa-f2D11702722/accessed 10/03/16

Could Mrs Zuma be the next President of South Africa?

Ms Dlamini-Zuma’s fans often say that “South Africa is ready for a woman president.” Would she be any good? Her record in government is not exactly impressive. Susan Booysen, author of the book “Dominance and Decline: The ANC in theTime of Zuma”, predicts that she would be much like her ex-husband.

zumaThere is talk that His Excellency the President of South Africa, Jacob Zuma seems to be wondering how to share custody of the country with his ex-wifeMr Zuma must retire as South Africa’s president in 2019A quiet race is under way to pick the next president of the ruling partythe African National Congress.

Mr Zuma faced 783 charges of corruptionfraudmoney-laundering and tax evasion before he became presidentMr Zuma’s critics speculate that he wants his ex-wife at the helm as an ally to argue that the charges-which he claims are politically motivated-should never see the light of dayThe odds of another Zuma running South Africa are hard to gauge.

At the COSATU national congress in late November several unions openly backed Mr Ramaphosasaying that the deputy president of the ANC should succeed as party presidentas in the pastMr Ramaphosa stands to benefit from the mess Mr Zuma has made of the country’s credit rating.

In December the president replaced a respected finance minister with an unknown backbencherspooking the marketsMs Dlamini-Zuma’s fans often say that “South Africa is ready for a woman president.” Would she be any goodHer record in government is not exactly impressive. Susan Booysenauthor of the book “Dominance and DeclineThe ANC in theTime of Zuma“, predicts that she would be much like her ex-husband.

I think Zuma is going to be with us long after he has actually left office,” says Ms BooysenMr Zuma may not be able to name his own successor, howeverMr Zuma often giggles throughout his questions in Parliament for the yeardespite the serious issues before hima severe droughtan economy close to recession and reports that taxpayers are to fork out for a brand-new4 billion-rand presidential jet

 

 

 

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source: 1.picture-http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/WO-AK427_AFUNIO_P_20120715175528.jpg/ 2.content:http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21685324-giving-presidency-his-ex-wife-might-be-jacob-zumas-best-shot-avoiding?zid=304&ah=e5690753dc78ce91909083042ad12e30

Is President Zuma to blame?

President Zuma is a father, husband of many wives, grandfather and many other titles to his name. He is no doubt charismatic and a people’s person. Despite what I or others have said, he conducts himself in a respectful manner whilst abroad. In contrast to the other African leaders President Zuma has kept the peace of South Africa.

There has been much discussion about forcing  Jacob Zuma to resign from his post as President of South Africa. To those who have been following my blogs you would have sensed my frustrations of Zuma’s leadership. I must admit that on several blogs I have also sadly ridiculed Mr Zuma. However, I have been witnessing South Africa’s governmental processes – these findings I must add, are my opinions and are no way to incite hatred or animosity but to stimulate logical reasonings.

So here it goes:

President Zuma is a father, husband of many wives, sugar-daddy  and many other titles to his name. He is no doubt charismatic and a people’s person. Despite what I or others have said, he conducts himself in a respectful manner whilst abroad. In contrast to the other African leaders President Zuma has kept the peace of South Africa.

President Zuma has managed to make friends with all marginalised countries to which the Western countries have stigmatised.

He is resilient enough to do as he pleases yet acknowledges the power of law and the democratic process. So if President Zuma is destroying the country singlehandedly – I find that to be absurd as he definitely does not have the capabilities with a democracy to do as he pleases… Have we forgotten that this is not an autocracy government?

My blame lies with a hopeless opposition who is definitely no match to the ANC. I blame Mr Zuma’s cabinet, they place him in vulnerable circumstances which are not fair and results in his failure and embarrassment. The issue with the Finance Minister – where was the Chief of Staff?  Why does Mr Zuma’s PR Team or speech reader not make it easier to spell out the number so that the President does not fumble?

Secondly I blame us all. We have the same attitude when it comes to education. We chuck our kids at school expecting it to be the teacher’s role forgetting that they are our kids. Likewise blame the President when the country is failing because we pay taxes!

Ask not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country!  President Zuma will continue to be President and there is nothing you or I can do! But we can see that those who can – do nothing!

What is your Minister of Parliament doing to bring about change? That’s who you should blame!

Dear Rt Hon “Freedom” Fighter, Politician, Civil Servant, and Gravy-Train Passenger.

Take for example my childhood town in Port Shepstone, I have fond memories of a steam engine train called the “Banana Express”. The train used to take tourists along the beautiful south coast boasting the manicured gardens, well kept public pools and lovely little shops. However once the “freedom” fighters got into power they have turned this garden of a site liken to a dump -yard and constant complaining of the abuses of the “whites’ yet they are willing to watch their town deteriorate so long as their household income is not affected by the plague they are causing.

Dear Rt Hon “Freedom” Fighter, Politician, Minister of Parliament, Civil Servant, and Gravy-Train Passenger,

image1
If you look at the wall you could see the text, “Banana Express”

Why is corruption and embezzlement the way of life for most African government leaders and to whom you are emulating? It seems that there is no shame in being called the dark continent where poverty, wars, corruption, AIDS/HIV, illiteracy and starvation are rampant. Ironically Africa is rich with deposits of oil, gold, diamonds and yet even after centuries of being freed from the dominion of the colonist exploiters, Africa has raised some of its own to further ravage itself. Maybe this is not a colour issue like some make it out to believe, for whether it be black or white the results are the same for the exception that the white-men were not as heartless as many “freedom” fighters believe for they at least built schools, hospitals and infrastructure which is yet evident and in some cases the only evidence of development within South Africa today.

Take for example my childhood town in Port Shepstone, I have fond memories of a steam engine train called the “Banana Express”. The train used to take tourists along the beautiful south coast boasting the manicured gardens, well kept public pools and lovely little shops. However once the “freedom” fighters got into power they have turned this garden of a site liken to a dump -yard and constant complaining of the abuses of the “whites’ yet they are willing to watch their town deteriorate so long as their household income is not affected by the plague they are causing.

Tacky sign board in Port Shepstone advertising Coke
Tacky sign board to Port Shepstone advertising Coke

Memories of my childhood are being eroded whilst a younger generation is growing up in what they are told “has been left by apartheid”. These “freedom” fighters have no longer a cause or struggles, so they are becoming skilled speech makers. Having listened to some of their reasons for the mess they have caused is really quite entertaining. I don’t believe that they listen to themselves and hear the contradictions of the changes to their stories.

image4We watch and see as they dismantle our country, as they strip it apart and sell it off to foreigners. Yet, the delusion is incredible that these very people will tell you the benefits that they have contributed and how rosy life is! Yet much of the majority are talking about you, your new car, your new houses and you luxury holidays. Enjoy it my dear Civil Servants… the masses are coming for you.

Politics in South Africa today is devoid of political content.

democracyDriving from the international airport, I was struck by the sheer wretchedness of Cape Flats: the series of black townships, comprising mostly shacks with corrugated steel roofs, that stretch from the highway almost to the horizon. Few people — tourists or locals — want to talk about the Cape Flats. But there is no better starting point for a discussion of the state of contemporary South Africa.

I was shocked by the degree to which the predominant emotions, 21 years after the end of apartheid, are not of hope and expectation, but of fear and despair.

“It’s not rosy,” a leader of the United Front opposition political movement in the eastern Cape city of East London told me, “but it’s not yet totally bleak.” That was about the most optimistic view I heard.

For much of the black population, fear and despair arise out of the sense that while South Africa became a democratic nation after apartheid, in many ways very little has changed.

Khayelitsha, the largest township in the Cape Flats, was established in 1983 by the apartheid government to house about 200,000 black workers. According to the 2011 census, almost double that number now live there. More than half live in “informal housing” — shacks, in other words.

IMG_1707Almost four in 10 people are unemployed. Barely one-third have piped water in their dwellings; a quarter have no flush toilets; about one in five has no access to electricity. Many of these figures are worse than they were under apartheid; others are little changed.

Apartheid had an immensely dehumanizing impact. But it also caused communities to forge powerful social bonds and channel anger into resistance and liberation movements.

The destructive effect of contemporary policies has led not to the creation of stronger bonds, but to the unraveling of the fabric of society. The social anthropologist Leslie J. Bank describes it as a form of “fractured urbanism,” in which traditional social organizations have collapsed and forms of social control have dissolved, creating a political and social vacuum.

Unlike under apartheid, there is no obvious target for people’s rage. There are protests, almost daily, against housing conditions, police brutality and political corruption. There is considerable anger against the ruling African National Congress, in both national and local governments. Yet the relationship of people, even of critics, to the A.N.C. is complex. It remains, for most, the party that brought about liberation, and so retains considerable moral legitimacy.

The confusion about whom to blame for conditions that seem little improved from the days of apartheid has often led people to turn on one other. The explosion of xenophobic violence, directed against migrant workers from other African nations, that swept through South Africa in 2008, and again this year, is one expression of this. So is the growing conflict between apartheid-defined categories of people, like “blacks” and “coloreds.”

New conflicts have also emerged, like the one between longtime residents of Cape Town’s townships (who call themselves “borners” — people born in the townships) and immigrants from elsewhere in South Africa. Such divisions have been exacerbated, even exploited, by sections of the A.N.C. As the failure to transform the lives of the poor has eroded support for the party, many A.N.C. politicians have turned to the politics of ethnicity and identity to strengthen their base.

It is a development that has long been evident, but that has really gathered strength under the leadership of South Africa’s current president, Jacob G. Zuma. Mr. Zuma has unashamedly exploited his Zulu identity — “100% Zulu Boy” read the slogan on supporters’ T-shirts before the 2009 general election. And to shore up his support, he has promoted supposedly traditional African values, enhancing, for example, the powers of unelected tribal chiefs.

Last year, his government attempted to pass the Traditional Courts Bill that would have created a separate legal system for millions of people living in the former Bantustans, allowing local chiefs to act as judges, prosecutors and mediators, with no legal representation and no right of appeal.

“Let us solve African problems the African way, not the white man’s way,” Mr. Zuma proclaimed in defense of the law.

“It’s shocking how the language of apartheid now comes out of black mouths,” one former activist said to me.

The situation has been made worse by the issue that dominates South African politics today: corruption. Almost daily, there is a new scandal. Accusations reach up to the highest state office — Mr. Zuma himself has been embroiled in a long-running scandal — and threaten to besmirch the integrity of institutions like the National Prosecuting Authority.

Corruption expresses the way that state patronage has come to define politics. Politics in South Africa today “is devoid of political content,” in the words of a former A.N.C. activist, Raymond Suttner. Instead, “it relates to who is rising or falling, as part of ongoing efforts to secure positions of power and authority.” Using corrupt resources to win favours from different social groups and factions has helped entrench a dangerous cronyism in national politics.

While sections of the political elite have tried to manipulate the politics of ethnicity to bypass democracy, many at the grass-roots level have opposed these moves. Popular opposition killed the Traditional Courts Bill. Last month, a community in the Eastern Cape won a court battle to elect its own leaders, rather than have them imposed. It cannot be right, the court agreed, that the people of the Transkei region “enjoyed greater democratic rights” under apartheid “than they do under a democratically elected government.”

It is a telling comment on the state of contemporary South Africa that the government can be chastised for being less democratic than it was under apartheid. If the future of South Africa is not to be totally bleak, it is in such struggles for democracy against the corrupt elite that hope must lie.

Written by Kenan Malik, he is the author, most recently, of “The Quest for a Moral Compass: A Global History of Ethics” and a contributing opinion writer.

Is Civil War Brewing in South Africa?

Inevitably, frictions between the ANC & EFF are ever increasing with opposing views, and each one attempting to take control of the spoils. Could this be the brewing of civil war in South Africa?

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) led by Commander and Chief Julius Malema has in recent years dominated the political stage of South Africa. Despite eefthe leadership change of the Democratic Party, the main opposition party to the government, they have still been overshadowed by the EFF.

In contrast, and no matter how corrupt the African National Congress (ANC) has become they are still being seen as the undisputed “heavy weight champion” political party of South Africa.

The EFF are not shy to controversy, proudly wearing berets and red overalls, not mentioning the many disruptions to Parliamentary proceedings and opposing to a non-compliance of any rule or protocol even with their own leader recently suspended for openly accusing an h0nourable peer as a murderer. The EFF continues to grow and samobilize attracting its followers with a better life of taking it by force from those who have “plenty”.

Meanwhile the ANC are observing and are clearly struggling to deal with the Prodigal son, Malema. It’s been so long that anyone so radical as JuJu (Malema)- who has shaken up the years of complacency and security that no party would be able to challenge their right to the throne. So confident that even President Jacob Zuma even once mentioned that “the ANC will be in power even when Jesus comes”.

Inevitably, frictions between the ANC & EFF are ever increasing with opposing views, and each one attempting to take control of the spoils. Could this be the brewing of civil war in South Africa?

Sleep well Mr President Zuma!

Sleep well Mr President as you have robbed some child who is watching you and your henchmen when you abuse his/her parents who will soon rise to take your place and justice will soon be replaced for revenge.

red1Europe is currently facing vast numbers of illegal emigrants trying to seek entry into its borders. The media watches the authorities’ every move and are ready to expose upon any breach of immigrants’ human rights.

Meanwhile… in South Africa despite its stance for equality and justice – we see as residents watched from across the street as the Red Ants (security firm- depicted for their red uniforms) went from flat to flat, emerging with their belongings. Smaller items were being thrown from the windows while larger items such as beds, couches, wardrobes and fridges were carried out.

Children and families have been left without shelter and their possession disrespected. Even criminals are treated with greater respect and as the Authorities’ and other African countries watch as their people are being abused whilst they rejoice. Rejoice because many of the illegal immigrants have escaped the tyranny of their leadership.

ants3Just maybe South Africa has brokered some deal to make life difficult for the immigrants so that they may discourage others from leaving Zimbabwe and similar abusive countres? So often Africans talk about the abuses of colonialism yet we can clearly see that Africa can’t even look after its own.

Just maybe this black and white difference were a lie to distract the masses for a few who desired after power grabbing. For the irony in all this is that the “freedom fighting” party is now as bad as the proponents of Apartheid as they watch injustice daily and sometimes are its very source of such hurt.

Sleep well Mr President as you have robbed some child who is watching you and your henchmen when you abuse his/her parents who will soon rise to take your place and justice will soon be replaced for revenge.

(Pictures filed by Naledi Shange, News24)

Who do you think you are? Are you not aware that I am Julius? – Why is SA forgetting who Julius really is!

We are now living in a time when we should be fearful and uncertainty looms upon the horizon, not aware what tomorrow would bring as black supremacy radicals are growing. Why is everyone forgetting who Julius Malema really is?

When South Africa voted the African National Congress (ANC) into power in 1994, there was fear that the masses would be out of control and violence would erupt on our streets. j

Instead the transition of government did have some hurdles but there was forgiveness and repentance as the rest of the world witnessed an historical epoch. Everyone especially the white people, embraced South Africa as their home and that we all are part of the rainbow nation.

Back then was a time to be fearful, a time of uncertainty, as all South Africa wanted to be hopeful. However we are now living in a time when we should be fearful and uncertainty looms upon the horizon, not aware what tomorrow would bring as black supremacy radicals are growing.

Why is everyone forgetting who Julius Malema is?  Here is a sequence of events you should consider.

African National Congress Youth League leader Julius Malema rose to the ANCYL presidency in 2008.

April 7 2008

Malema is elected as youth league president ahead of Saki Mofokeng at the league’s chaotic conference in Bloemfontein. Rumours of vote rigging abounded as the conference ran a day over its scheduled end.

June 16 2008

Malema says the league will take up arms and “kill” for African National Congress president Jacob Zuma at a youth day rally at Thaba ‘Nchu in the Free State. Opposition parties slam Malema’s comments—labelling them as hate speech—and the ANC distances itself from the remarks.

July 24 2008

Malema says Zuma will lead the country from prison if he was arrested following a legal battle with the National Prosecuting Authority regarding his indictment on charges that included allegations of racketeering, corruption, money laundering and fraud.

September 10 2008

Malema vows to “eliminate any force” blocking Zuma’s path to the presidency. He says the “Malema generation” would be responsible for making Zuma president of the country, regardless of corruption charges levelled at him. “Any force in our way we will eliminate. We are on a mission here. We will crush you. It doesn’t matter who you are, even if you are in the ANC,” he was quoted as saying.

September 21 2008

President Thabo Mbeki resigns after a damning judgement by Pietermaritzburg high court judge Chris Nicholson, which scrapped corruption charges against Zuma. The judge further intimating that the former president interfered in the case against his former deputy. Malema actively campaigned for his resignation referring on many occasions to Mbeki as a “dead snake” whom the ANC would soon bury.

January 23 2009

Malema suggests the woman who accused Zuma of rape had a “nice time” in an address to Cape Peninsula University of Technology students. “When a woman didn’t enjoy it, she leaves early in the morning. Those who had a nice time will wait until the sun comes out, request breakfast and ask for taxi money,” said Malema. Zuma was acquitted of rape charges brought against him by an HIV-positive woman, known as “Khwezi”, in 2006.

January 30 2009

He turns down a nomination to Parliament after being submitted as a candidate by ANC branches, saying “it’s only for old people”. Malema said he may reconsider a position in Parliament in 10 or 15 years.

February 11 2009

Malema criticises Education Minister Naledi Pandor for not taking action to resolve a salary dispute at the Tshwane University of Technology. He suggests the London-educated minister should “use her fake American accent to address our problems”.

February 23 2009

Malema turns down a challenge to publicly debate his Democratic Alliance counterpart Khume Ramulifho, saying he won’t debate with “Helen Zille’s garden boys”. The challenge came after he said former DA federal leader Joe Seremane’s role in the party was “to smile at the madam”.

May 1 2009

Calls DA leader Helen Zille “a racist little girl” and cautions her that as the new Western Cape premier she would be reporting to “President Zuma”.

July 2 2009

He issues his first call for South Africa’s mines to be nationalised, saying imperialist forces needed to accept “the failures of capitalism” and prepare for “the state to own the mines and other means of production as called for in the Freedom Charter”.

August 6 2009

He lambastes Zuma’s Cabinet appointments in the economics cluster, saying “We [black people] cannot just be reduced to security and the very important issue of economy is given to minorities.”

August 22 2009

Malema wades into the furore surrounding athlete Caster Semenya’s gender testing and calls on the government to prevent the tests from being carried out. “The International Amateur Athletic Federation decision to test Semenya is racist and sexist and we must not allow them to do it,” he said.

October 10 2009

Malema slams the prosecution of police National Commissioner Jackie Selebi, saying he was targeted “because he was black”. “In Jackie Selebi they want to prove a point they failed to prove in Zuma: that we [Africans] are corrupt, we like easy money, we like alcohol, we like women and we’ve got no skill,” he said.

November 1 2009

Malema is alleged to have taken traffic officers in Limpopo to task after they stopped him for allegedly speeding in his Range Rover. Malema apparently asked the officers: “Who do you think you are? Are you not aware that I am Julius, the president of the youth league? I know that some of you hate me.”

November 7 2009

Malema is granted around-the-clock VIP protection by the ministry of police after they conducted a report revealing that his life could be in danger. Opposition parties and civil rights groups slammed the move as an abuse of state resources.

December 13 2009

Malema labels members of the South African Communist Party (SACP) as “greedy yellow communists” after the national executive committee member Billy Masetlha were booed at a recent SACP conference in Polokwane.

January 11 2010

He slams former president FW De Klerk as a product of apartheid, who was forced to release Nelson Mandela from prison. Addressing a crowd of several thousand at Drakenstein Prison, Malema said De Klerk left a legacy of “racism, unemployment and housing problems”.

February 1 2010

He makes clear his intention to have ANC secretary-general Gwede Mantashe replaced by former league president Fikile Mbalula after a three day lekgotla in Muldersdrift.

February 11 2010

Malema said former president Nelson Mandela supported nationalisation, both before and after he went to prison. “We stand opposed to any peace-time heroes who want to oppose nationalisation as not being a policy of the ANC. Madiba himself is better placed to give a proper interpretation of the Freedom Charter, because Madiba was in the forefront as a volunteer-in-chief,” Malema said.

March 8 2010

Allegations arise that Malema may have benefited from tenders in his home province of Limpopo. He is proved to be a director at SGL Engineering Projects, which secured government contracts worth R140-million between 2007 and 2009. It is also alleged Malema may not be up to date with his taxes, with opposition parties calling on the South African Revenue Services to investigate him.

March 15 2010

Malema is convicted of hate speech following his comments made about the woman who accused Zuma of rape. The Equality Court orders Malema to make an unconditional apology and pay R50 000. He appeals the ruling. On the same day, Afriforum lays another hate speech complaint against Malema at the Equality Court for singing Ayesaba amaGwala which contains the words dubul’ ibhunu (“kill the boer”). Malema vows to continue singing the song.

March 18 2010

Malema pays a visit to Molemo “Jub-Jub” Maarohanye in prison on the eve of the hip-hop artist’s court appearance for the murder of four schoolboys after a drag racing incident in Soweto.

March 26 2010

Public Protector Thuli Madonsela announces a probe into tenders awarded to Malema’s SGL Engineering Projects after complaints by AfriForum Youth and the Congress of the People (Cope).

April 2 2010

Embarks on a visit to Zimbabwe where he endorses President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu-PF party and lauds the country’s controversial land grab process.

April 8 2010

ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema kicks a BBC journalist Jonah Fisher out of a press conference in Luthuli House, calling him “a bastard and a bloody agent”.

April 18 2010

ANC orders him to appear before a disciplinary committee following:

Criticising President Zuma while drawing a comparison between the leadership of Zuma and former president Thabo Mbeki

Controversially pronouncing support for the Zanu-PF in Zimbabwe

His public altercation with BBC journalist Fisher; and

His continued singing of the Ayesaba amaGwala despite an ANC order not to do so, following the death of white supremacist Eugene Terre’blanche.

May 11 2010

Malema escapes serious sanction at his disciplinary hearing with a suspended sentence, a R10 000 fine and an order to attend anger management classes as well as publicly apologise to Zuma. Malema is warned he faces suspension or even possible expulsion from the ANC should he transgress again.

July 19 2010

Malema mounts a campaign to purge the league of his opponents ahead of the league’s conference in June 2011 beginning with former Limpopo chairperson, Lehlogonolo Masoga.

September 20 2010

Earns a rebuke from Zuma at the ANC’s national general council policy meeting for his calls to nationalise mines and for suggesting he would not support the president at the ANC’s Mangaung conference in 2012. Malema still succeeds to have the issue of nationalise placed up for review by ANC top brass ahead of Mangaung.

December 2 2010

Refuses to pay the R50 000 fine imposed on him by the Equality Court after losing a case brought against him by the Sonke Gender Justice Network for the comments he made about Zuma’s rape accuser.

April 7 2011

Calls on citizens to vote for the ANC in the local government elections so that it will “keep Mandela alive and well”.

“President Mandela is sick and you don’t want to contribute to a worsening condition of Mandela by not voting ANC. President Mandela will never endure if the ANC is out of power,” he said. The comments come after Mandela fell seriously ill in January.

April 10 2011

Malema arrived at his hate-speech hearing protected by at least five armed bodyguards toting M14 assault rifles. “It’s none of your business who is paying for it, but it is not government,” spokesperson Floyd Shivambu said when asked about the guards.

May 20 2011

Dubs DA spokesperson Lindiwe Mazibuko a “tea girl” after refusing to debate with her in a live television broadcast following the announcement of local government election results.

June 16 2011

Malema is re-elected unopposed for a second term.

July 6 2011

He labels the United States a “blood thirsty imperialist” for bombing Libya with its Nato allies and lambastes the South African government for voting in favour of a United Nations resolution for a no-fly zone over the North African country.

July 19 2011

He is reported to be building a R16m mansion on the site of his now demolished Sandown home. He refuted the allegations, saying the reports were “not factual” but if they were, it would “be nobody’s business”.

July 24 2011

A report by City Press reveals Malema allegedly receives funds funnelled through the “Ratanang Family Trust” from unscrupulous businessmen for securing tenders in Limpopo. Malema goes to ground, with the ANCYL slamming the reports and saying the fund is used solely for charitable purposes. Following the reports, AfriForum lays graft charges against Malema at the Brooklyn police station in Pretoria.

July 31 2011

The league issues a statement saying that it would work in tandem with opposition parties in Botswana to unseat President Ian Khama’s Botswana Democratic Party which they labelled a “footstool of imperialism”.

August 18 2011

After weeks of verbal volleying, the ANC announces it will bring disciplinary charges against Malema and his spokesperson Floyd Shivambu for violating the party’s constitution and sowing divisions within the organisation. This is followed by the Hawks announcing it had launched a formal investigation into Malema’s business dealings along with Public Protector Thuli Madonsela.

August 30 2011

Malema’s supporters clash with police and journalists on the first day of the youth leader’s hearing. Several journalists and police are injured as they are pelted with stones and bottles. ANC flags and T-shirts bearing the image of President Jacob Zuma are also burnt by the protesters. The ANC condemns the violence and moves the hearing from Luthuli House.

September 21 2011

Malema’s disciplinary hearing is once again postponed. On the same day, legal representatives of Malema and the ANC head back to the equality court to challenge the order banning the singing of dubul’ ibhunu as too broad.

October 5 2011

Malema is admitted to hospital in Polokwane with “flu-like symptoms” on the eve of the resumption of his disciplinary hearing . The ANC accepts his absence and schedules the hearing to be resumed later in October.

October 19 2011

Malema is quoted as using a racial slur in reference to South Africans of Indian descent when addressing a gathering in Thembelihle south of Johannesburg. He sticks to his statement but apologises for any misunderstanding and offence caused.

October 27 2011

Malema leads a “march for economic freedom” from Johannesburg to Pretoria. About 5000 protesters stop at the Chamber of Mines and Johannesburg Stock Exchange on their way to Pretoria, demanding nationalisation of the mining and banking sectors. The marchers’ final stop is the Union Buildings, where a memorandum of demands for widespread changes to the economy is handed over. While the march is hailed by the youth league as a success that struck a blow against capitalism, it is widely regarded as little more than a public relations exercise reinforcing Malema’s support.

October 30

The Sunday Independent reports Malema faces imminent arrest for alleged involvement in corruption related to the awarding of tenders in Limpopo.

October 31 2011

Reports emerge Malema jetted off to Mauritius after the youth league’s economic freedom march. He allegedly swilled expensive champagne and partied with several benefactors of tenders in Limpopo province.

November 7 2011

After several postponements, closing arguments in Malema’s disciplinary hearing are delivered during late night meetings in Johannesburg.

November 9 2011

The ANC announces it will reveal the outcome of Malema’s disciplinary hearing at a press conference to be held at Luthuli House in Johannesburg. The youth league confirms Malema will be not be present at the announcement.

November 10 2011

Malema and several youth league leaders are suspended from the ANC for a period of five years after being found guilty of undermining party leadership and sowing division in party ranks for his criticism of President Jacob Zuma. He is also guilty of bringing the party into disrepute by recklessly denouncing the Botswanan government, in conflict with ANC policies. He is found not guilty on separate charges of inciting hatred and racism. Malema acts with immediate vitriol stating he will “fight the enemy until the end”.

November 16 2011

Malema tears into the ANC NDC by announcing the youth league’s decision to appeal their leaders’ suspension. He labels the NDC’s findings as “unfounded” and calls for a political solution to the melee. He again reiterates the suspensions are politically motivated in an attempt to silence the league.

November 24 2011

Malema meets the midnight deadline to appeal his suspension.

November 27 2011

According to a report in the Sunday Times Malema says he “finished politically” and intends moving into the cattle farming industry in Limpopo. He again refers to his suspension being politically motivated and that the NDC had a “predetermined” outcome.

December 19

Malema is handed a political lifeline by being voted onto the Limpopo ANC’s provincial working committee.

January 8 2012

Malema quietly sits on stage and listens to Zuma’s speech at the ANC centenary celebrations, while his supporters chant “Juju! Juju!” before and during the address. ANC chairperson Baleka Mbete is forced to call them to order on several occasions and eventually threatens to have them removed unless they compose themselves. Malema supports follow this up with a mini-walkout as Zuma is talking. After the speech, Malema is pictured laughing and joking with former President Thabo Mbeki. While Malema was told he would not be allowed to make a speech at the centenary celebrations, he held a rally just outside Mangaung.

January 24 2012

The appeal hearing into the NDC’s decision to suspend Malema and co is held amid a media blackout at Luthuli House in Johannesburg.

February 4 2012

The decision to suspend Malema and other youth league members is upheld. The ANC’s NDCA chairperson Cyril Ramaphosa describes the league’s argument the case is politically motivated as “nave”. The NDCA does however offer the league an opportunity to argue in mitigation of sentence—a privilege also be offered to the ANC. The NDC must reconvene within two weeks to hear the arguments.

February 10 2012

Malema continues his verbal assault on Zuma and other senior ANC leaders at the league’s annual lekgotla in Centurion. Without referring specifically to Zuma, Malema said: “We need more decisive and sophisticated leadership to understand the current phase of our struggle.” He also called on the ANC to choose a leadership that is capable of putting the interests of the nation before their own.

February 13 2012

Malema’s arguments for aggravating circumstances in mitigation of sentence begin at Luthuli House in Johannesburg. After an outcry over only being granted two hours per respondent to argue their case, the process is adjourned until February 16.

February 29 2012

Malema is expelled from the ANC for portraying the its government and its leadership under President Jacob Zuma in “a negative light”, and for statements on regime change in Botswana, at a press conference on July 31 2011. He has been given 14 days to appeal his sentence.

Would you agree that our President Zuma is an “angel” compared to Julius Malema?

These are crucial times for South Africa despite President Zuma’s corruption cases. Mr Zuma has done his best in developing trade and industries in South Africa whereas Julius Malema may be too inclined with black supremacy to seek the overall economic benefit of South Africa!

Boundaries move slowly but gradually just enough so that society does not realise the ground that they were standing on has moved. The political landscape of South Africa is changing and it’s changing using humour. Many of South Africans don’t mind bad news so long as it comes with humour, as being very much optimistic we South Africans would not admit to the glass being half-empty.
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It is with that as a premise to which I would like to mention the person who is keeping our President Zuma up at night that he actually had to build a state of the art bunker at his popular homestead.

We must recognise and be alert that Julius Malema is no Mandela or Zuma! In fact he is an inexperienced, uneducated politician with radical ideology to that synonymous of Robert Mugabe.

jmI strongly believe that the mainstream media will regret providing Malema all the free publicity to fuel his campaigns. May the same media not forget that he was the one verbally abused the British reporter years back, once in power he will remove all freedom of expression. Thus labelling anything opposing to his thinking as “racist”.

These are crucial times for South Africa despite President Zuma’s corruption cases. Mr Zuma has done his best in developing trade and industries in South Africa whereas Julius Malema may be too inclined with black supremacy to seek the overall economic benefit of South Africa!