Are you a Tendering Rogue?

Tendering rogues destroys our economy, mocks our justice system and should be charged for treason. The local Press is the best place to report corruption.

rebateAllocation of tendering areas are agreements in which tendering competitors divide markets among themselves. In such plans, competing companies allocate specific customer or type of customers, products, or territories among themselves. For example, one tenderer will be allowed to sell to, or tender on contracts let by, customers allocated to the other competitors. In other schemes, competitors agree to sell only to customers in certain geographic areas and refuse to sell to, or quote intentionally high prices to, customers in geographic areas allocated to conspirators companies.

However, in countries where corruption is a common problem it tends to disturb the market mechanisms and impede economic development. Corruption in public procurement makes the officials or the politicians in charge purchase goods or services from the best briber, instead of choosing the best price-quality combination. The result may be construction projects several times as costly as necessary, or the acquisition of goods not actually needed.

In 2013-14, for example in South Africa the public sector spent R500-billion on goods, services and construction. At least R30-billion of this was lost to corruption particularly related to tenders.

According to Andvig and Moene (1990), the negative dynamics can be explained as follows: When corruption is rare, the economy is in a “low- corruption-equilibrium”, in which both demand and supply is limited. Looking for someone to bribe is more risky when the bureaucrats hold high ethical standards. With increasing corruption levels, however, the request for bribes becomes easier, so does the proposal of bribes. The moral scruples of corruption as well as the risk of being caught, falls with a higher frequency of corrupt acts. This way corruption may lead the economy into a vicious circle, ending up in kleptocratic circumstances under which corruption is the standard, where honesty is too costly, with a general disregard of law and a higher level of criminal activity, and where each individual is busy making the most for him/herself, feeling no obligations for the country. The situation is often referred to as a corruption-trap. This self-propagating force of corruption may also explain parts of the difference in corruption levels sometimes experienced by quite similar economies. (Andvig and Moene, 1990; Søreide, 2000).

Corruption is rarely a one-sector phenomenon, occurring only in one institution of the state, or at one level of the bureaucratic hierarchy. Where it exists as a problem, it tends to pervade large parts of the state administration. The impairment of judicial systems, the police and investigative institutions are particularly destructive in this respect. Frequent failures to sanction and arrest perpetrators create a general disregard of existing laws. Trying to curb corruption by implementing anti-corruption measures into the procurement procedures can therefore appear optimistic in such a setting.

Corruption is rarely a one-sector phenomenon, occurring only in one institution of the state, or at one level of the bureaucratic hierarchy. Where it exists as a problem, it tends to pervade large parts of the state administration. The impairment of judicial systems, the police and investigative institutions are particularly destructive in this respect. Frequent failures to sanction and arrest perpetrators create a general disregard of existing laws. Trying to curb corruption by implementing anti-corruption measures into the procurement procedures can therefore appear optimistic in such a setting.

Reporting corruption

In many cases bribery is detectable only for the colleagues of a corrupt official. The cases difficult to observe for the police may be apparent for the associates. These can, for instance, discover unreasonable argumentation in favour of a certain company. Other people involved in the tender may also come across corruption. A way to report on the cases should therefore be established and published. A problem with anonymous “whistle-blowing”, however, is the risk of dishonest information reported in order to blacken certain persons and companies. Still, anonymous information has to be accepted to obtain knowledge about corruption from people fearing sanctions. In any case, the safety of persons revealing corruption scandals has to be considered.

When corruption is revealed the persons involved should be charged. Sanctions are therefore mainly a matter of the legal system. Either imposed by judges or the bureaucracy, the sanctions should, however, include a system of incentives in which the penalties for the corrupters grow more than proportionally to the price of the public contract.

Racial Profiling Exists and Must Stop!

Racial profiling has been widely criticised when it comes to predicting crime and is actually illegal in certain countries. The basis of racial profiling is the assumption that people of a certain race or ethnic background are more likely to commit certain crimes.

Racial profiling is a method of using racial or ethnic characteristics to predict whether a person is likely to commit a crime. The use of this much criticised method has risen in recent years with the perceived rise in the threat of terrorism.

What Is Racial Profiling?Racialprofiling

Racial profiling has been widely criticised when it comes to predicting crime and is actually illegal in certain countries. The basis of racial profiling is the assumption that people of a certain race or ethnic background are more likely to commit certain crimes. After the 9/11 terrorist attack, the US authorities used racial profiling conclusions to investigate foreign nationals of middle eastern descent. These conclusions were used even if there were no other factors that warranted investigation of these individuals.

Racial Profiling in the UK

Although racial profiling is not officially used in the UK the statistics do show otherwise. Under section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000, police officers are permitted to stop and search individuals with justifiable cause. According to the statistics provided by the Ministry of Justice some police do seem to be using racial profiling. Asian people were over five times more likely to be stopped and searched than white people. Black people were seven times more likely to be stopped and searched than white people. Only 0.6% of the searches ended in arrests for terrorism offences.

Why Racial Profiling isn’t Working

There have been a number of high profile cases that have highlighted the flaws in racial profiling. Colleen Larose, the middle aged, white, Philadelphian suburban dwelling woman is the antithesis of the typical terrorist profile. Self named ‘Jihad Jane’ was arrested on charges of conspiring with overseas militants to murder and if necessary to become a martyr for radical Islam causes. Colleen Larose is only one of many terrorists who do not fit the usual racial profile. Larose, along with many other white terrorists, is one of the reasons why racial profiling has been seriously undermined when it comes to profiling criminals.

Racial Profiling is Alienating Communities

One of the big dangers of racial profiling is that this method may actually be counter productive. The shocking rise in stop and search incidents of certain ethnic groups will only alienate these communities. Trust in the authorities from black and Asian communities will deteriorate. What could have been a source of information for the police from these communities will no longer exist due to the abuse of racial profiling. One senior counter-terrorism official claimed that community relations achieve results, stop and search does not.

Common Uses of Racial Profiling

Racial profiling isn’t used solely as an anti-terrorism tool. There are many instances of this type of profiling being used ‘unofficially’ throughout society. These can include monitoring of suspected shoplifters in stores and the stop and search of vehicles based solely on the race of the driver. Racial profiling as an airline security measure has been widely used throughout the world. In many cases this type of profiling is used at the customs point to determine who the officials will search. This can be seen as discrimination, and one of the dangers is that while others are searched the real criminals go free.

The Alternative to Racial Profiling

Human rights organisations such as Liberty have stated that racial profiling is not as effective as rational police methods. In January 2010 the Court of Human Rights ruled that section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000 does violate the right to respect for private life. According to Liberty, the profiling of suspects should be based on actual suspicion and real intelligence. Stopping and searching on the basis of skin colour, name or dress code is not a valid reason.skin

Racial profiling is increasingly coming under fire from many organisations as an ineffective method of crime prediction. There is no doubt that it is routinely being used and abused by authorities such as the police. Since the ruling by the Court of Human Rights in 2010 the government will now have to address this serious issue. If the abuse of racial profiling continues it will no doubt lead to increasing mistrust in the police and government officials.

source:http://www.civilrightsmovement.co.uk/facts-racial-profiling.html

Racists are a dying breed soon to be displayed at the Rainbow Circus

Yet the leaders have time to continue writing absurd policies…just maybe South Africa should rename Parliament, “The Rainbow Circus,” the show is entertaining but the crowds are getting bored with your simple magic tricks. We all want to see you make the Country disappear!

It’s tough being a racist in the 21st Century and will be even more difficult as we progress to a secular progressive world. Gone are the days where racists’ names and identities of people groups are marginalised and insults where for public entertainment.

As I look at my country of birth, South Africa. I can’t help but to sympathise with the narrow “traditional bigoted” policy makers. Policies that direct a country’s economic growth based upon race. I believe many Black, Indian and even the South African Coloured are as or even more racist than the White oppressors.

The irony in all this is that the educated profession, born within the last forty years are inter-marrying. It will be a joke as these policies become obsolete as White marries Black and Black marries Indians, etc. What good would Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) Policy serve? eef

I will tell you… we will use your (BEE) for growing even more wealth. As our kids will be all registered “Black” with natives names. This dying breed of politicians is the Jurassic Age; it is only a matter of time until their era is entirely wiped out.

Let me tell you of the “man of the future” they will be of a mixed race. saNow whether this sits well with our fascists in society today it’s tough – as those who are living in the real world are enjoying the diversity.

…go ahead make a law that gives percentages based upon your “blackness or whiteness” to claiming a level playing field –  whilst the White farmers are being butchered, the traditional rural tribesman is yet without basic services and an entire country has a third-world infrastructure built by the “White-man”.

Yet the leaders have time to continue writing absurd policies…just maybe South Africa should rename Parliament, “The Rainbow Circus,” the show is entertaining but the crowds are getting bored with your simple magic tricks.

We all want to see you making yourselves disappear …and not our Country!

The United States of Africa – A New Government is slowly merging

Many people see it as a toothless watchdog, however, consisting of a club of leaders who look out for one another rather than advancing democracy.

AUHave you heard of the African Union? It was established in 2002, the African Union (AU) replaced the Organisation of African Unity (OAU), which had focused on liberation struggles from colonial rule and apartheid. President Zuma has stressed that incorporating the African Union anthem in SA schools and churches will help build African unity.

“Starting today every school, church or community, choirs and individuals must practice the African Union anthem, so that we can sing [it] at all our important gatherings and celebrations,” Zuma told the crowd at the Africa Day celebrations.

“If we start with our generation now that they sing it and understand it in schools, we have begun to plant a patriotism that will never go away to our citizens.”

Zuma urged South African institutions and companies to begin flying the African Union flag together with the South African flag. Africa Day falls on May 25th each year and marks the day the Organization of African Unity – known today as the African Union, was founded in 1963.

The AU began with the following objectives which include fostering unity and solidarity between African countries, accelerating political and socio-economic integration, and promoting peace, security, democracy and human rights in the continent.African-Union

The AU is based in Ethiopia and has a decision-making assembly, made up of heads of state and government, and a representative parliament, which sits in South Africa.

More a political union than an economic body, the AU has staged several military interventions, sending peacekeepers to Burundi, Sudan and Somalia.

Many people see it as a toothless watchdog, however, consisting of a club of leaders who look out for one another rather than advancing democracy.

How the Loss of Property Rights Caused Zimbabwe’s Collapse -Is SA following ?

 For many years, Zimbabwe was known as the “jewel” of Africa. Rich in raw materials and productive farmland, it grew enough food to feed its people and export the rest. The farm sector supplied about 60 percent of the inputs to the manufacturing base—so agriculture was truly the backbone of the economy.
Yet, unlike most other African countries, Zimbabwe had a sophisticated manufacturing base as well. That sector employed thousands of workers who made things such as textiles, cement, chemicals, wood products, and steel. Zimbabwe also had a strong banking sector, vibrant tourism, and more dams than any other Sub-Saharan country except South Africa. Most people trusted the police and believed the court system would treat cases fairly; indeed, the low crime rate rivaled that of many European countries. Perhaps most important, the country had a secure rule of law, with a modern property rights system that allowed owners to use the equity in their land to develop and build new businesses, or expand their old ones. All that led to strong real GDP growth, which averaged 4.3 percent per year after independence in 1980.1
The Disparity in Farmland
  • Despite those successes, the notion of land reform had political appeal prior to 2000, when President Robert Mugabe began seizing commercial farms. Anyone flying over Zimbabwe on a clear day would have seen huge differences in the farming regions, and perhaps better understood the country’s long-standing concern with land reform. In some areas of the country, there were vast tracts of well-irrigated commercial farms, producing thousands of acres of tobacco, cotton, or other cash crops. In other regions, small, dusty communal farms were crowded together, typically suffering from a lack of water. Those farms produced maize, groundnuts, and other staple crops. About 4,500 white families owned most of the commercial farms. In contrast, 840,000 black farmers eked out a living on the communal lands—a legacy of colonialism.
  • More than 80 percent of white-owned commercial farms had changed hands since Mugabe came to power in 1980, and less than 5 percent of white farmers could trace their ancestry back to the original British colonists who arrived in the 1890s. Still, the disparities between blacks and whites fueled calls by Mugabe and others to return the fertile “stolen lands” to black Zimbabweans. 2
  • However, what many observers missed was that the fertility of the land wasn’t determined just by rainfall or quality of the soil. Although communal lands tended to be in drier areas, many were directly adjacent to commercial farms or in high-rainfall areas. In addition, there were commercial farms in very arid parts of Zimbabwe. Yet in nearly all cases, the communal areas were dry and scorched, whereas the commercial lands were green and lush. 3
The Disparity in Property Rights
  • Why the difference then? A good part of the answer lies in the difference in property rights between the two areas. Commercial farms had secure property titles that gave farmers large incentives to efficiently manage the land and allowed a banking sector to loan funds for machinery, irrigation pipes, seeds, and tools. Those institutions developed the most sophisticated water delivery system in Southern Africa (excluding South Africa). Of the 12,430 dams in this entire region, an astonishing 10,747 are in Zimbabwe. Although Zimbabwe has only 7 percent of the land area of the region, it has 93 percent of all the reservoir water surface area. 4 That gave the country a tremendous cushion against droughts. Large commercial farms also employed about 350,000 black workers and often provided money for local schools and clinics. Small-scale commercial farms, run by about 8,500 black farmers, had access to credit and were also productive.
  • Communal lands, on the other hand, were typically plagued by tragedy-of-the-commons types of problems, as the land became overused and greatly eroded over time. In addition, without property titles, there was often squabbling over land use rights between village residents and the village chief, since each village had complicated use restrictions on how the land could or could not be used.
  • Unfortunately, the vital role that property rights played in underpinning the Zimbabwe economy was invisible to most people. What was immediately apparent to any observer was the enormous and tangible contrast between the vast and lush commercial farms and the small and dusty communal ones. War veterans saw the commercial farms as a just prize for having supported Mugabe during the independence movement 20 years earlier, and they continued to clamor for the commercial farmland prior to the 2000 parliamentary election. Nevertheless, Zimbabwe’s constitution forbade the wholesale seizure of the land without proper compensation, and the law-abiding people of Zimbabwe supported that notion by and large. In early 2000, they rejected Mugabe’s attempt to broaden the state’s confiscatory powers in a voter referendum. In addition, in a 2000 poll by the South Africa–based Helen Suzman Foundation, only 9 percent of Zimbabweans said land reform was the most important issue in the election.
  • Some of Mugabe’s advisers apparently knew better than to upend property rights. In early 2000, Mugabe was handed a confidential memo from the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe, the country’s central bank. The memo predicted that going forward with farmland seizures would result in a pullout of foreign investment, defaults on farm bank loans, and a massive decline in agricultural production. 5
  • I’m The memo would prove to be staggeringly prescient. Unfortunately, Mugabe ignored it. Between 2000 and 2003, his government went ahead and authorized the seizure of nearly all the 4,500 commercial farms. The official goal was to divide the farms into hundreds of thousands of small plots for traditional black farmers. In practice, most plots ended up in the hands of Mugabe’s political supporters and government officials, whose knowledge of farming was meager.
The Economic Implosion
  • The predictions of the central bank memo would come to haunt ordinary Zimbabweans. During the next four years, the economy began to implode with increasing speed. By 2003 it was shrinking faster than any other in the world, at 18 percent per year. 6 Inflation was running at 500 percent, and Zimbabwean dollars lost more than 99 percent of their real exchange value. 7 Today the economy continues its extraordinary freefall. Here are some other things that have happened since 2000:
  • Financial investors have fled, wondering if other businesses might be seized next. Foreign direct investment fell to zero by 2001, and the World Bank’s risk premium on investment in Zimbabwe shot up from 4 percent to 20 percent that year as well.
  • Because the government no longer enforced titles to land, there was far less collateral for bank loans. Dozens of banks collapsed; those that did not collapse refused to extend credit to farmers.
  • Commercial farmland lost an estimated three-quarters of its aggregate value between 2000 and 2001 alone as a result of lost property titles. That one-year loss, by my estimates, was $5.3 billion—more than three and a half times the amount of all the foreign aid given by the World Bank to Zimbabwe since its independence in 1980. 8 Without equity in the banking system, vast networks of economic activity collapsed across all sectors of the economy. Seven hundred companies closed by the end of 2001, as industrial production declined by 10.5 percent in 2001 and an estimated 17.5 percent in 2002. 9
  • The demise of the agricultural sector led to widespread famine, as the commercial farmers left for other African countries such as Zambia, Nigeria, and Ghana, taking with them their intricate knowledge of farming practices.
  • The Zimbabwean government has blamed the country’s peconomic collapse on a variety of external factors, including Western conspiracies and racism. Mugabe’s most potent excuse, however, proved to be the drought. As he reiterated at the United Nations summit in September 2005, Zimbabwe’s economy is suffering because of “continuous years of drought.” 10 In fact, dams in Zimbabwe were full throughout the economic downturn. 11 Unfortunately, irrigation pipes are no longer owned by anyone, so they are being dug up for scrap in a free-for-all. Some are even melted down to make coffin handles, one of the few growth industries left in the country.
  • Yet, some people seem to believe Mugabe. The 2001–02 drought, for example, was called one of the worst in the past 50 years by an IMF official. 12 In fact, after I analyzed the data from Zimbabwe’s 93 rainfall stations, it turned out that the 2001–02 “drought” came in 13th in the past 50 years, with rainfall in the 2001–02 planting year only 22 percent below average. Indeed, as Figure 1 shows, the close relationship between rainfall and GDP growth sharply disconnected in 2000, the first year of the land reforms. Subsequent years show above-average or average rainfall, even as the economy continued to plummet.
  • My econometric estimates indicate that the independent effect of the land reforms, after controlling for rainfall, foreign aid, capital, and labor productivity, led to a 12.5 percent annual decline in GDP growth for each of the four years between 2000 and 2003. 13 The drop in rainfall in the 2001–02 growing season contributed to less than one-seventh of the overall downturn. Without above-average rains, Zimbabwe’s economy would have been in even worse shape, hard as that is.

Zimbabwe thus provides a compelling case study of the perils of ignoring the rule of law and property rights when enacting (often well-intentioned) land reforms. We have seen how Zimbabwe’s markets collapsed extraordinarily quickly after 2000, with a domino-like effect. The lesson learned here is that well-protected private property rights are crucial for economic growth and serve as the market economy’s linchpin. Once those rights are damaged or removed, economies may be prone to collapse with surprising and devastating speed. That is because of the subsequent loss of investor trust, the vanishing of land equity, and the disappearance of entrepreneurial knowledge and incentives—all of which are essential ingredients for economic growth. I hope this lesson will not be lost on other countries that find themselves at the crossroads of land reform.

Notes
This bulletin is based on Craig Richardson, “The Loss of Property Rights and the Collapse of Zimbabwe,” Cato Journal 25, no. 3 (Fall 2005).
1 This excludes 1992, during which Zimbabwe experienced its worst drought in 50 years, causing GDP to drop by 9 percent. There were no other years of negative growth during the 1990s, except 1999, in which GDP declined by 0.7 percent.
2 Geoff Hill, The Battle for Zimbabwe (Cape Town: Zebra, 2003), p. 102.
3 This can easily be seen in satellite photos of Zimbabwe that show the stark differences in the communal versus commercial lands, even when they are directly adjacent to each other. See http://www.geog.umd.edu/LGRSS/Projects/degradation.html.
4 Veliyil V. Sugunan, “Fisheries Management of Small Water Bodies in Seven Countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America,” FAQ Fisheries Circular, no. CMXXXIII, FIRI/C933, Section 2.3.1., 1997. See http://www.fao.org/documents/show_cdr.asp?url_file=/docrep/W7560E/W7560E02.htm.
5 Hill, p. 110.
6 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, African Economic Outlook 2003/2004—Country Studies: Zimbabwe (Paris: OECD, 2004), p. 357.
7 International Monetary Fund, Zimbabwe: 2003 Article IV Consultation—Staff Report (Washington: IMF, July 2003), p. 28.
8 Richardson.
9 “Bankers Slam Zimbabwe’s Policies,” BBC News Online, September 4, 2001, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/1524821.stm.
10 “Let Them Eat Potatoes, Says Mugabe,” The Star ( South Africa), September 19, 2005. See http://www.thestar.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=128&fArticleId=2881963.
11 For example, Andrew Natsios of U.S.AID reported at a foreign press briefing on August 20, 2002, that there was plenty of water in Zimbabwe’s dams at the height of the 2001-02 drought. Also, Zimbabwe’s Daily News reported on May 15, 2002, that, according to Peter Sibanda, Bulawayo’s director of engineering services, dams in the province of Matabeleland were 74 percent full. See http://www.zimbabwesituation.com/may16_2002.html#link14.
12 Ismaila Usman, “Statement by Ismaila Usman, Executive Director for Zimbabwe,” International Monetary Fund, Article IV Report, Zimbabwe, 2003.

The Evolution of Democracy, introducing the “Rogue Government”

The definition of “democracy” is “rule by the people”. Hence if the people are deceived, kept secrets from, cheated and mistreated and ignored by their representatives and otherwise kept out of the democratic process, then democracy no longer exists.

demoDemocracy is dependent upon truthfulness, information, and transparency by its elected and appointed officials, as well as those candidates aspiring for office. This in itself is the fundamental basis for democracy’s ideology.

Failure to satisfy that premise results in the officials functioning under the veil of secrecy. To which results to lying, cheating and stealing, and even if they do not engage in such activities, their veil of secrecy invites suspicion that very well be.demo

The definition of “democracy” is “rule by the people”. Hence if the people are deceived, kept secrets from, cheated, mistreated and ignored by their representatives and otherwise kept out of the democratic process, then democracy no longer exists.

So, when the Minister of Parliament/ Senate no longer is truly represent the people or when the people are no longer “ruling” – then what do we have? Many have coined the phase, “a failed democracy”.

I would go on to mention that this form of government somewhat hijacked from its mandate from the people’s purpose takes on the system of a “rogue government”.

The Funny thing about Load Shedding

Did you hear about that joke of a President, the Electrical Company Director and Energy Minister was in a meeting when the lights cut off. The Secretary ran into the boardroom and exclaimed, “so sorry sir its load shedding”. They all looked at her in amazement as if she was deluded.

loadsheddingDid you hear about that joke of a President, the Electrical Company Director and Energy Minister was in a meeting when the lights cut-off. The Secretary ran into the boardroom and exclaimed, “so sorry sir its load shedding”. They all looked at her in amazement as if she was deluded.

Is that not hilarious? The punch line is the fact that currently Johannesburg coined its slogan, “A World Class City in Africa” may just be as primitive as the Bronze Age. It takes a World Class City to have the luxury to switch on a light. South African do have light switches…yes, fancy expensive ones but no electricity.jozi

This World Class City does not know how to produce enough electricity for all South Africa. Since 2008, load shedding has cost the economy an estimated R300 billion. Thousands have lost their jobs as businesses have had to scale down, or scale back on investments. In addition to this, the international reputation as an investment destination has been seriously damaged by the government’s inability to service the country’s energy needs.

The funny thing about load shedding is that the electric gates, fences and CCTV cameras are all affected. Most foreigners don’t realise that load shedding means that even the traffic signals don’t work. The property I’m currently residing at has biometric scanners and the latest technology in security – all dependent on Electricity. I don’t like to imagine what could be the consequences of a robbery or an invasion from a neighbouring country?

In this World Class City Electricity is NOT a basic need only a luxury.

The “Ideal” Life… does it really exist?

What if there was another world, which lies beyond your perceptions to that which goes further than your imagination or your “ideals”?

The word, “ideal” is synonyms to words like perfect, model and ultimate. We are all aspiring for the ideal lifestyle, the ideal family, the ideal job and just about everything we do we want to either do better or at least have the intention to be “ideal”.

I also hear the voices of the preacher saying that we must be content and be happy with our circumstances. Can one be truly content if they have not arrived at their idealistic goals and achievements? Is that not a conflict of selling the vision short? Are we not taught to press on towards the prize? Yet it appears that many are prepared to settle for this fatalistic philosophy. Sure, there are some mornings when I feel like I just had enough and will be content to not think of the future and its sacrifices.

We all have goals and plans for what we believe would make us happy, we all yearn to have the perfect lifestyle, family and job. When we do possess our goals, the novelty of the short-lived achievement – persuades us that we can do better and the pursuit of “ideals” begins again…strange is it not?

However in saying that some through the courage and bravery did venture into the unknown hoping there was more to life. Humanity at one point believed that the earth was flat and if one were to go to the edge that they could be endangered of falling off. Can you imagine the heart-wrenching anticipation as the sailors passed across to what was considered the end of the world (only to find another world which lies ahead)?

What if there was another world, which lies beyond your perceptions to that which goes further than your imagination or your “ideals”?

How are immigrants taking our jobs?

Most people who are under the “poverty-line” are finding it difficult to seek employment in the United Kingdom. The influx of foreigners making the United Kingdom home- poses a great threat.

british jobsjobs

Most people who are under the “poverty-line” are finding it difficult to seek employment in the United Kingdom. The influx of foreigners making the United Kingdom home- poses a great threat. The plight of the natives finds themselves being at times having to compete for jobs on merit-basis “in their own country”. In addition these foreigners are willing to work for lower wages, longer hours and willing to go the extra mile “trying to please their boss’” all these attributes creates challengers for the locals, as a job should never be given that much of preeminence.

Many do not understand the burdens of being poor and living demands within the United Kingdom. Despite the numerous governmental benefits: Job seeker allowance, Disability allowance, Child benefit, Low-income support, Emergency grants, Tax credit, and Free medical prescription from a pharmacy (Wales only).

There are basic commitments such as the Sky plus, Broadband and mobile bills. Not mentioning the credit loans for the LCD 40” Television and the IPad and the annual IPhone upgrades. (Please don’t misunderstand that this is not all Britain, but my experiences- from working with charities have given me insight to the world of the “poverty stricken”). Many of these poverty households have no idea how to manage their finances. Therefore all the benefits received are just not enough. Also strangely the source of most murmurings regarding foreigners taking jobs derive from these disgruntle patriots’.

I would not want to go through the here-say chatter about how Muslim communities how they “multiply like rabbits” for they don’t see children as a liability but blessings therefore given the most chosen name for a male child in 2009 was, “Mohammed”. Or the fact that these minorities are buying up the villagers and neglect their houses “creating a slum neighbourhood”.

Whether you admit it or not, these irrational prejudices exist and are formed by the hurt and the envious because many are just too lazy to get-off the gravy train and be productive. Many are with regret of not being able to pay for tuition so that their kids could have a better life, get away from the bondage of claiming benefits for generation after generation. Fearful of taking a job should the benefits be stopped or less than when they were not working.

When Moses was leading the Israelites to the promise land, “the land flowing with milk and honey” he definitely had no idea of Britannia…in this land- if you don’t work – you can still eat!

Future President of South Africa? – Don’t misjudge Julius Malema for a fool

Many people make jokes about Mr Malema and his incoherent rhetoric, his educational background and obliviousness nature in dealing with allegations. People laugh at his uniform and protests. However I’m afraid that Mr Malema would soon have the last laugh.

jm

Many people make jokes about Mr Malema and his incoherent rhetoric, his educational background and obliviousness nature in dealing with allegations. People laugh at his uniform and protests. However I’m afraid that Mr Malema would soon have the last laugh.

Peruse through his curriculum vitae below and see that this is not your “garden-boy”. He is ambitious and his ideologies are controversial. He deliberately captures and spins the media to his bidding. He has been strategic and cautious in choosing his battles- given that 2013 may have not been the best year for him. This morning’s news article mentions: “The opposition Economic Freedom Fighters, which has contested very few by-elections since its launch as a political party, will take part in by-elections in KwaZulu-Natal for the first time on Wednesday.” If Mr Malema is such a fool then how is it that he appears to be recently the voice of reason. The voice which is speaking the people’s language, this may well be the people spokesmen! He has some seriously controversial policies, which can be liken to the leaders of Zimbabwe, Kenya and Uganda, and to that just may result in the South African economy being destroyed. But is that a bad thing? Should monetary gain be the greater importance in comparison to an entire nation? Should not the mines and commodities of South Africa belong to the people of South Africa? Or the land of the homeless to reclaim property to which had been plundered? At present everyone is mentioning the symptoms of a bad managed government however Mr Malema is brave enough to express his radical ideas for change. The politicians in their lovely suits and entourage are too busy being pampered while Mr Malema is in his overall working hard to be the President of South Africa. Given that the GDP & GNP may decline, that inflation may increase and that food scarcity and foreign aid may diminish. Given that foreigners may have to leave and that Indians, Whites, and Coloured may fall at the hands of a radical for who needs skill when equality and justice means more than money?

The CV of the future President of South Africa:

CURRENT POSITION (S)
Founder Member | Economic Freedom Fighters
May 2013 – present
Social Development and Community Services

Commander in Chief | Economic Freedom Fighters
2013 – present
Publishing, Printing and Print Media

PREVIOUS POSITION(S)
President | Youth League | African National Congress
South Africa | 2008 – 2012
Government, Public Administration and Defence

National President | Congress of South African Students
South Africa | 2001
Government, Public Administration and Defence

Provincial Chairman | Limpopo | Congress of South African Students
South Africa | 1997 – 2001
Government, Public Administration and Defence

General Secretary | Youth League – Limpopo Branch | African National Congress
South Africa | 1995 – 2012
Government, Public Administration and Defence

Regional Chairman | Seshego Branch | African National Congress Youth League
South Africa | 1995 – 2012
Government, Public Administration and Defence

EDUCATIONAL HISTORY
SECONDARY
Mohlakaneng High School, Limpopo, South Africa

TERTIARY
University of South Africa
2011 – present
Bachelor of Arts degree – Communications and African languages
University of South Africa
2008 – 2010
Two-year diploma – Youth Development